This site focuses on these questions


Sept 13: WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD found in CT on Aug 28th! Read this fascinating story at Greg's site....

SEPT 10: CURRENTLY WORKING WITH THE eBIRD TEAM TO GET ALL HURRICANE BIRDS INTO eBIRD. PLEASE ENTER YOUR STORM-BIRDS INTO eBIRD THIS WEEK, OR CONTACT ME (robben99@gmail.com) OR MARSHALL ILIFF TO ASSIST.

This Hurricane Irene blog was meant to be helpful for just ONE WEEK to provide REAL-TIME reporting of ALL Atlantic coast storm-birds DURING the "teeth" of the storm, but the storm's winds and flooding killed our electricity and this blog. Without electricity, water and internet for 102 hours prevented us reporting during the most exciting part of the hurricane and its birding aftermath.
Instead of trying to "catch-up" and reconstruct those 102 missing hours from the archived listserv reports, we will instead 1) summarize them, 2) learn what we can from this "experiment" in real-time-hurricane-bird-blogging, 3) request eBird data entry of all hurricane reports, and 4) get ready for the NEXT hurricane this year!

Therefore we will refocus on the latest current map of the NEXT hurricanes and their projected storm tracks.....
Tropical Storms and Hurricanes (and the wind speed probabilities map... Wind Speed Projections ) and prepare again to answer these questions....
What impacts will the next hurricane have on birds on the East Coast of the USA (plus the western Atlantic and maritime Canada)? And how will that be reflected on the twenty main internet bird lists covering that region?

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Tropicbird discovered in Connecticut!

This White-tailed Tropicbird was discovered exhausted on a road in northwest Connecticut during Hurricane Irene, 50 miles from the nearest salt water....


Go to Greg Hanisek's site for the full fascinating story (and thank you for the photo Greg!)....  Talking Nature with Greg Hanisek » Irene’s Biggest Present


And please enter your Hurricane Irene birds into eBird (and to ARCC or your local state ARC Avian Records Committee).  The eBird team has identified these as the most important species they would like entered into eBird, please.....

TOP PRIORITY:

Tropicbirds
SOTE  Sooty Tern
BRTE  Bridled Tern
GBTE  Gull-billed Tern
SATE  Sandwich Tern
LHSP  Leach's Storm-petrel
BSTP  Band-rumped Storm-petrel
HUGO  Hudsonian Godwit
jaegers
pelicans

Second priority:

BLTE [definitely elevated numbers]  Black Tern
RNPH  Red-necked Phalarope
REPH  Red Phalarope
inland shorebirds incl. Whimbrel, BB Plover etc.
inland COTE  Common Tern
CATE  Caspian Tern
ROYT  Royal Tern

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Leach's Storm-petrels many miles inland

Here is just one example of the unusual situations created by Hurricane Irene.... a Leach's Storm-petrel fighting the wind over Bantam Lake, CT forty miles inland from the nearest salt water....

Leach's Storm-Petrel on Bantam Lake, CT August 28, 2011.  This photo thanks to Fran Zygmont 
Notice that this nice photograph captures so many of the field marks:  the long angled wings, the slightly forked tail, the feet not projecting beyond tail, the pale bar on the upper wing reaching the leading edge of the wing, and the somewhat divided white rump patch.

Remember that (unlike Wilson's Storm-petrels) this is a very wary open ocean bird which is often hard to attract close to a boat, even 100 miles out on the ocean, and yet here it is on an inland fresh water lake!

And here is a recent map of the Leach's Storm-petrel distribution from eBird....note the paucity of reports from Connecticut, prior to August 28th.....


Thanks to Fran Zygmont for this photograph of this oceanic species far from its normal ocean travels, and for entering this field report into eBird this week (which will soon be reflected as a new little pink rectangle in west central Connecticut)!

the NEXT hurricane(s)

===================

Thomas Robben to ctbirds....       Sep 12

Did you think we were done with hurricanes for the year???

Thanks to all storm-birders for submitting your Irene-bird-reports to BOTH eBird AND your state ARC avian records committee. Thanks for the direct email discussions with most of you CT storm-birders this week.
If you have not done that dual data entry, please do it within the next week or so;  or contact me or Marshall Iliff for assistance doing it.

Our "one-week" hurricane blog (intended to do "real-time" Florida-to-Newfoundland bird reporting DURING the peak of the hurricane, by monitoring all those listservs) was, ironically, knocked down by the storm for 102 hours during the the "best" days of August 28- Sept 1 ....and we have decided NOT to do a detailed catch-up reconstruction of those 102 hours (partly because most of those reports have already "rolled-off" their state bird-listservs [such as CTBirds] into archives, or some into oblivion).

Instead we are....
1)  assembling SUMMARIES of the Hurricane Irene birds at the hurricane blog,

2)  highlighting some of the more interesting sightings, such as Fran Zygmont's INLAND Leach's Storm-Petrel photo...
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/
Hurricane Irene 2011 (and its birds)

3)  learning what we can from this hurricane and this experimental blog, including the best safe LOCATIONS for watching the next storms (thanks to Nick Bonomo and many others),

4)  and looking toward the NEXT HURRICANE by studying this evolving hourly weather map every few days....
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at4.shtml?5-daynl?large#contents
Post-Tropical Cyclone MARIA

Thank You and Good Birding,
Tom Robben
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/
Hurricane Irene 2011 (and its birds)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Thomas Robben <robben99@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, Sep 3, 2011 at 12:11 AM
Subject: Fwd: Hurricane Irene redux on eBird
To: JerseyBirds@princeton.edu
Cc: Marshall Iliff <miliff@aol.com>, Thomas Robben <robben99@gmail.com>

We have just witnessed an incredible hurricane, with historic bird consequences.  We need everybody's help to capture their observations into eBird, as Marshall Iliff describes below....
There is a lot to be learned from a panoramic Florida-to-Maine-&-the-Maritmes view of what this hurricane did, so please enter your field observations into eBird as soon as possible, within a week or so.
(And additionally do not forget to report to your state avian records committee if your bird is that level of rarity.)
There is really quite an amazing story here, so lets try to document all of it, please.
Tom Robben

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Marshall Iliff <miliff@aol.com>
Date: Thu, Sep 1, 2011 at 5:30 PM
Subject: Fwd: Hurricane Irene redux on eBird
To: nbonomo@gmail.com, birdfreak007@yahoo.com, Steve Mirick <smirick@comcast.net>, tbj4@cornell.edu, pollypie@att.net, Thomas Robben <robben99@gmail.com>, Andy Farnsworth <af27@cornell.edu>, Bill Hubick <bill_hubick@yahoo.com>, Ned Brinkley <ensifera@aol.com>, Nathan Dias <dias@crbo.net>, spencer hardy <curlewsandpiper17@gmail.com>

Would welcome cross-posts on this...we really have an opportunity to have all the storm watches in eBird if we act now...

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Marshall Iliff <miliff@aol.com>
Date: Thu, Sep 1, 2011 at 5:27 PM
Subject: Hurricane Irene redux on eBird
To: Massbird <massbird@theworld.com>, bostonbirds@googlegroups.com

Massbird,

With news still coming in for reports from Hurricane Irene, I have posted a tentative summary of some of the news with visualizations from eBird etc. See the story here:

http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/hurricane-irene-redux
Hurricane Irene redux — eBird

We already have a couple hundred Sooty Tern sightings in eBird but there are many more that we still need to get in the system. Only about half of the tropicbirds are in, so the Delaware, upstate New York, New Hampshire, and one of the New York City sightings still need to be entered. Many Rhode Island and eastern Massachusetts finds are yet to be entered as well, and it would be great to be able to see a full picture for any species within the next week or so. So again, please encourage your friends who got out storm birding to help us compile all the sightings in one place.

We are very interested in using eBird to gain a better understanding of this storm, so we invite all birders who got out seeking storm-blown seabirds to please please PLEASE submit those sightings to eBird (whether or not you connected with anyrarities--the negative data is helpful too). We hope to be able to produce an animated summary of Sooty Tern sightings, showing the progression of the storm and where and when sooty Terns appeared. If we can get this together quick enough (it will depend on New England birders making sure all Sooty Tern sightings have been entered with correct times), then maybe the visualization will help us all make better storm birding plans for Hurricane Katia http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at2+shtml/024712.shtml?5-daynl.
Post-Tropical Cyclone KATIA

Thanks, and if anyone has questions about how to get their storm birding list into eBird, please get in touch with me directly.

Best,

Marshall Iliff

****************************
Marshall J. Iliff
miliff AT aol.com
West Roxbury, MA
****************************
eBird/AKN Project Leader
www.ebird.org
www.avianknowledge.net
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Ithaca, NY
****************************

===================

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Please enter all your storm bird reports into eBird

Today is September 10th....
The goal is to get all the storm bird reports into eBird as soon as possible.  The purpose of our worksheet here is simply to make sure all reports get entered into eBird,  for Connecticut (CT).....

Click here to view the worksheet of the main hurricane birds reported on the CTbirds listserv August 28-30....
WORKSHEET for Irene Birds for CT, for Aug 28-30

The data in this worksheet is currently being reviewed, adjusted, completed, etc..
Note that all data in this worksheet, including email addresses, was taken from the public CTbirds listserv.

Please enter all your hurricane bird reports into eBird, and send me an email (robben99@gmail.com) so I can indicate that in the eBird status column of this worksheet.  Please also let me know if this worksheet is missing anything important.

Here is a snapshot image showing what part of this worksheet looked like on 9/10, in its latest form....


You can click on this image (and then stretch your computer's window) to enlarge it.....


Here are the most important hurricane birds to enter into eBird.....

TOP PRIORITY:

Tropicbirds
SOTE  Sooty Tern
BRTE  Bridled Tern
GBTE  Gull-billed Tern
SATE  Sandwich Tern
LHSP  Leach's Storm-petrel
BSTP  Band-rumped Storm-petrel
HUGO  Hudsonian Godwit
jaegers
pelicans

Second priority:

BLTE [definitely elevated numbers]  Black Tern
RNPH  Red-necked Phalarope
REPH  Red Phalarope
inland shorebirds incl. Whimbrel, BB Plover etc.
inland COTE  Common Tern
CATE  Caspian Tern
ROYT  Royal Tern

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Summaries of "Irene's birds"

While I am off researching the listserv archives of all the Atlantic coastal states (to see if my aggregation & reporting process can be automated), several nice summaries of probable Hurricane Irene birds have been published, including...
1) the NEW YORK summary copied in this blog (Hurricane Irene 2011 (and its birds): New York State summary of Hurricane Irene birds),
2) Marshall Iliff's comprehensive EAST COAST summary (Hurricane Irene 2011 (and its birds): Summary of Hurricane Irene's Birds), and now a
3) CONNECTICUT summary by James Purcell, using the CTbirds posts.... Thank you James!....

=================
"Subject: Hurricane Irene birds
From: eyeflight16 AT optonline.net
Date: Sun, 04 Sep 2011 14:47:53 +0000 (GMT)
I was bored this morning so I thought I would put together a list of all the
species and numbers of birds that we got from Hurricane Irene. I must say that
the list is quite impressive. However, do keep in mind this list isn't entirely
accurate. First of all, I only used reports from CT birds so I could be missing
some birds, and I apologize to anyone if I missed your birds. Second, although
I tried as hard as possible to avoid this, there could be some repeats of birds
seen here. (Example: a Sooty Tern seen at Griswold Point flying west could be
the same Sooty Tern seen flying west at Stratford Point), but I tried to use
logic to get rid of these repeated birds. Also, I know that all of these birds
may not have actually been blown in by the hurricane, such as the Lark Sparrow.
Nonetheless, here are all the rarities from this past week.�

1 White Ibis
89 Black Terns
66 Sooty Terns
1 Long-tailed Jaeger
2 Band-rumped Storm-Petrels
189 Red-necked Phalaropes
5 Leach's Storm-Petrels
11 Royal Terns
8 Caspian Terns
7 Wilson's Storm-Petrels
3 Red Phalaropes
1 Black-necked Stilt
6 Hudsonian Godwits
3 Brown Pelicans
1 Bridled Tern
4 Marbled Godwits
3 Parasitic Jaegers
1 Long-billed Dowitcher
1 Great Shearwater
1 Manx Shearwater
1 American Avocet
1 American White Pelican
1 Gull-billed Tern
1 Lark Sparrow

Wow! What a week for CT birding!�

James Purcell
Fairfield"
=================

Friday, September 2, 2011

Copying the archived hurricane bird reports from each state

Since this blog lost its primary goal to be a real-time communications tool DURING the middle of Hurricane Irene (because we lost electricity Sunday morning)  a revised goal for this blog will be to assemble all the Hurricane Irene bird-list field reports together here, for convenience and to prevent any of them from being lost, across all or most of the states Irene touched.

Unless anybody has any objection, several long pages in this blog will copy the exact archived bird list posts covering the Hurricane Irene week, from about 8/26 through 9/2.
The CTbirds archives are the first being experimented with, and you can easily see their work-in-progress by clicking on these links (they are simply long posts in this blog, and artificially stored under the date of 8/22)....

Hurricane Irene 2011 (and its birds): Experimenting with the full text from CT birds list from 8/22-8/28
this long page covers 8/22 through 8/28

Hurricane Irene 2011 (and its birds): Experimenting with the full text from CT birds list from 8/29
and this long page covers 8/29 onwards

You can always return to this blog's "home page" by clicking on the name of the blog at the very top of the screen. These long archived sections are so long that they cannot all fit on one screen, so scrolling down is not enough for you to find all the long pages (actually long posts) which will be coming here. You will have to use the TableOfContents on the right side (all listed artificially within August 22) or click on OlderPosts when you see that at the bottom of your scrolling.

Note that yellow and green background colors are being used to high-light different field reports (using two colors makes it easier on the eye to distinguish two close reports). Red will also be used to flag some key species within these reports. This work has just begun, and is currently incomplete. Extraneous posts which are not related to the hurricane will probably be deleted at the end of this process, which will shorten these long pages.

The goal is simply to capture the full text of all the storm posts for convenient review by birders (and perhaps for scientists and others to possibly use in the future to study Hurricane Irene and its birding consequences).  In some sense these posts are the first raw field reports, and have a value of their own, although your bird reports should ALSO be input to at least two other organizations....

1.  eBird
AND
2.  your state avian records committee (if the bird species is that level of rarity)

Suggestions welcomed.
The next step this weekend is to search for the same kinds of archives from the other Atlantic coastal states.

Day #10 How best to "catch-up" this blog?

OK, we got electricity and water back late yesterday (minus an hour outage today).  Now trying to figure out the best way to "catch-up" this blog, so that it might be useful to anybody, especially since the listserv (the bird lists) posts are "rolling-off" their sites, so now we need to look into the archives to see how much we can retrieve of the earlier reported birds. We were originally hoping to avoid this dilemma by limiting this blog to just ONE-WEEK of real-time hurricane bird reporting (ending on 8/31)....unfortunately the loss of electricity and internet service on sunday morning (8/28) stopped that idea. This leaves us with this question... is any kind of AFTER THE FACT summary worth creating here.  TBD.
I guess its time to look into every one of the coastal bird list listservs to confirm which have searchable archives and which do not.
More later tomorrow.

Summary of Hurricane Irene's Birds

Here is an excellent 9/1 summary of the most exciting bird reports "caused by" Hurricane Irene, written by Marshall Iliff in his excellent post on eBirds at...
Hurricane Irene redux — eBird
This is a direct quotation from Marshall....
====================

HURRICANE IRENE'S BIRDS

Hurricane Irene was a fantastic storm for birding for those that could get out safely to a viewpoint where they could watch for seabirds. As is often typical, the birds in these storms were few, but the ones seen were of very high quality.
Please note that this storm has also been very destructive, with unprecedented flooding in upstate New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont, and unfortunately, some loss of life. Our hearts go out to those negatively impacted by the storm.
Many of the below birds have yet to be entered into eBird, and if your friends saw some of these birds please ask them to get them into eBird so that the maps start to fill out with the full picture of these birds' occurrence!
  • White-tailed Tropicbird was the headline bird of Irene. In fact, we had predicted this based on elevated numbers offshore this year, writing: "Summer 2011 has been one of the best tropicbird years ever, so Hurricane Irene could carry a significant tropicbird load". Although there are historical records of birds displaced inland as far north as Vermont, never before has a storm produced double-digit numbers of tropicbirds and never before has a live one been observed on an inland lake in the Northeast. At least seven live birds were seen during the storm on 28 August.
  1. One or two adults at Prime Hook, DE, 28 Aug
  2. Three adults at Cape May, NJ, 28 Aug; first Cape May County record
  3. One adult and one immature off Manhattan, Hudson River, New York, 28 Aug
  4. One adult at Quabbin Reservoir, MA, 28 Aug; first Hampshire County record
  5. One at Lake Onota, Pittsfield, MA, 28 Aug; first Berkshire County record (possibly a second bird seen the next day)
And since the storm, an additional several birds have been found dead or dying:
  1. One found moribund (later died) in Rensselaer County in upstate New York 29 Aug or later
  2. One adult found at Rockaway Beach, NY
  3. One (presumed white-tailed, ID yet to be confirmed) at East Marion, NY
  4. One adult found moribund (later died) in Claremont, NH, on 30 Aug; a first state record
This makes for an unprecedented total of 12+ White-taield Tropicbirds i nthe Northeast in conjunction with this storm!
  • Inland Leach's Storm-Petrels were seen at Quabbin Reservoir, MA, as well as coastal birds in a number of places.
  • Band-rumped Storm-Petrels were displaced well northward and to the coast, but were not found inland (as they have been occasionally in the past). The most noteworthy were first from-shore records in Massachusetts (First Encounter Beach, 29 Aug, Nantucket and Tuckernuck Islands on 28 Aug) and Connecticut, and others were seen around New York City as well.
  • Inland Wilson's Storm-Petrels, very rare in hurricanes, were found at Lake Pontoosuc, Pittsfield, MA, on 28 Aug, and found dead in Northampton, MA, 30 Aug (specimen and photos)
  • Brown Pelicans after the storm in Galilee, RI ( photos) and Tuckernuck Island, MA.
  • Magnificent Frigatebirds seen in South Carolina, Pennsylvania, and New York.
  • Several inland jaegers included a few Parasitics and at least a few Long-tailed Jaegers.
  • A cooperative South Polar Skua was reported from a beach on Long Island, NY.
  • Widespread Sooty Terns inland and coastally from South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. One in Boston was the farthest north and east. Never before has the spread of Sooty Terns been so quickly and easily explored by other birders, and this all thanks to those that have already entered their reports with good notes so that they can be reviewed and accepted. Notice the spread of records on this map of Aug 2011 Sooty Terns -- you can pretty much see where the eye passed and how Sooty Terns occur out to the outer edges of the storm's wind field.
  • Bridled Terns, as expected, were seen in this storm, but only on the coast. We are not aware of any inland Bridled Terns, but birds on the coast or in estuarine bays and harbors were seen in North Carolina, Virginia, Delaware, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. Of those states, Bridled Tern is most unusual in Connecticut, the only one lacking pelagic waters (Bridled Tern is rare but regular in deep, warm pelagic waters north to Massachusetts). Compare the map of Bridled Tern occurrences to the Sooty Tern map above, and note how much farther inland Sooties were seen. See the discussion on this topic below.
  • Brown Noddy -- One seen from shore around Charleston Harbor on Friday 26 August. There are very few prior records. See Nate Dias's checklist here.
  • Lingering southern terns in several states for several days after the storm, including Black Skimmers in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island; Royal Terns in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut; and Sandwich Terns in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
  • Widespread Black Terns in record numbers in many places, such as eastern Massachusetts and New Hampshire (see Steve Mirick's list below)
  • An unprecedented fallout of Hudsonian Godwits was witnessed, with 193 counted at one site in New Hampshire (see Steve Mirick's list), and other lower numbers at two inland sites in Massachusetts, as well as coastal Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New York. Most notably, several were seen in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida, where the species is extremely rare in fall. Many other shorebirds "fell out" in the storm, likely a result of the large system 'grounding' birds in overland migration, but possibly also displacing some offshore migrants back to shore.
In addition, at least two GREAT landbirds were seen. One or both may have a storm connection, and aerial insectivores are the landbirds most likely to be transported by hurricanes:
  • A large swift, now believed to be Black Swift (very likely of the Caribbean population, which may represent a species distinct from western North American ones), was seen and photographed at Cape May. Most agree it was not a EuropeanApus swift (e.g., Common Swift), so whatever it is, it will represent a new record for the East Coast (the nearest Black Swift is from Point Pelee, ON). See Tony Leukering's report.
  • A Brown-chested Martin, just about the eighth record for North America, was seen at Cape Charles, VA. See Ned Brinkley's report.

 Here are some great eBird checklists from the storm:
  • 26 August, Charleston Harbor, Nate Dias [Brown Noddy]
  • 28 August, Cape May Point, Tony Leukering et al.'s hourly checklists include oneand then two White-tailed Tropicbirds (photos), possible Black Swift (photos),Black-capped Petrel, etc.]. See the full account with photos here.
  • 28 August, Quabbin Reservoir in western Massachusetts, Marshall Iliff et al. Seetotal list or the epic 16:00-17:00 hourly list [White-tailed Tropicbird, Sooty Tern (photos), Leach's Storm-Petrel, Parasitic Jaeger etc.]
  • 28 August, New York. White-tailed Tropicbird ( photos) etc. off Manhattan. SeeSam Stuart's list.
  • 28 August, New Hampshire. No southern rarities, but a fallout of Hudsonian Godwits and record-high Black Tern counts, along with some displaced seabirds. See Steve Mirick's list.
There is much more to be learned about the storm and its birds as people continue to organize their checklists and enter them in eBird. If you haven't put yours in yet, please do!


====================
Please report all your storm bird sightings BOTH into eBird AND to your local state birding authority (typically your state avian records committee).  It is very important to submit your reports for this storm. Thank you.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Day #9 One-hundred hours with no electricity, water, etc

It is 5pm Thursday September 1st and still no electricity, water, etc. in our area of central Connecticut.  It has been over 102 hours since we lost electricity, water, etc.  [shortly after this post electricity was restored]

This blog will be catching-up after electricity is restored, but meanwhile enjoy the excellent summaries emerging such as Marshall Iliff's summary on eBird today....
Hurricane Irene redux — eBird

And PLEASE follow Marshall's request for all Hurricane Irene bird reports to be entered in eBird. This will allow outstanding analyses, such as these maps of Sooty and Bridled Terns seen during this multi-day storm....
Explore Data for Sooty Tern map
and
Explore Data for Bridled Tern map

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Day #8 and still waiting for electricity, water, etc

It is 6pm Wednesday 8/31 and unfortunately (thanks to Irene) still no electricity, water, etc, but this blog will be catching-up as soon as we have electricity here in central CT. Also working with the eBird team on the best way to collect all possible reports of hurricane-related-birds.  More tomorrow, hopefully.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Lessons Learned from this hurricane/birding experience

If anybody would like to start a discussion of what we have LEARNED as birders/naturalists from this Hurricane Irene experience we will be glad to host that discussion here, starting with anybody's proposed list of lessons-learned.

I will start with the #1 lesson I learned (and it goes beyond birding)... to get an electricity generator in my house, so we are really prepared for the next storm which shuts down our electricity for a day or maybe a week!

The next lesson might be that the "best" birds are reported during (and the hours right after) the teeth of the storm! Or maybe that is too much of a generalization.

Feel free to email me at robben99@gmail.com or leave a comment "below" this post (you probably have to first click on this post so it is the only post visible to you).  This discussion will start slowly, since I will not have much internet access this week, and I cant really get into the discussion until I do have electricity restored.
Thanks,  Tom

Possible uses of blogs like this one

A REAL-TIME TOOL:

The primary objective of this blog was to be used DURING Hurricane Irene,  as a real-time communication tool, FOR JUST ONE WEEK ending on 8/31, to be useful to east coast birders to be more aware of the birding effects/opportunities/locations of Hurricane Irene, DURING Irene's approach and its immediate aftermath. Unfortunately we had a power outage which started at 11am Sunday and continues now 5pm Tuesday, including the crucial hours of Irene's main landfall, so that objective was compromised. 

A HISTORICAL TOOL:

Now that the hurricane is gone, and its effects are evaporating, we will try to use this blog to do a brief historical summary of Irene, but already the storm reports on the various state listservs are "rolling-off", and some of them will be hard to recover. We have just started to take daily snapshots of the main listservs, hoping to use them to assemble a comprehensive picture of all the hurricane birds of the past week.

To see the "rolling-off" problem you can click on some of the older links in this blog, and you will NOT be taken back to those particular reports (even though those links have the exact listserv ID numbers for those reports), but rather to the latest subset of reports on that listserv (because the older ones rolled-off, unfortunately). So these listservs are most useful during their current week (before the reports roll-off), but not as useful after the roll-off of the latest batch of reports (some listservs do archive but some dont). Some of this history is not archived. More thoughts on this next week, but meanwhile we will try to assemble a summary of "Irene's Birds" (assuming electricity returns soon).

Monday, August 29, 2011

Days #5 and #6 this blog down during temporary outage

This blog suffered from an Irene-caused electricity stoppage starting at 11am Sunday August 28th and not restored yet 2pm Monday August 29th.... this post is being made from a public building with internet access.  Our area suffered a loss of electricity, water, cellular telephone voice access, cellular data access AND landline phone access. Our house was very quiet indeed.

This blog will resume when electricity is restored to our area. We are one of 700,000 households in CT which still do not have electricity, for more than 24hours, and with no projected time of restoration. We heard that this is the worst/biggest electricity outage in the history of Connecticut.

This blog will catch-up on (and include) all hurricane birds reported on the listservs in any state along the East Coast, and beyond, plus those reports which have been emailed to me directly at robben99@gmail.com (thank you for those additional direct email reports to me, much appreciated).  

This catch-up will not happen today, although a small start may be made.  Look for this blog to be caught-up within a few days, as/when electricity is restored in Connecticut. When done, within a couple of days after we get electricity, this blog will contain a listing of every hurricane-bird report we could find.

Hopefully this blog and its aggregation of report summaries and links will be useful for anybody who wants to follow-up and do a more thorough/scientific analysis of the bird changes/patterns associated with this hurricane.

Sincere apologies for this temporary outage, especially since it occurred during the most interesting hours right before, during and after Irene's hard landfall in NY and CT!

Sunday, August 28, 2011

102 HOURS BLACKOUT BEGAN HERE

102 hour blackout of electricity, water, and internet began around 11am Sunday August 28 during the middle of Hurricane Irene smashing into NY and CT. This blog was crippled for 102 hours from Sunday onwards, and failed to deliver the ONE-WEEK of REAL-TIME reporting planned for. Truly very sorry. [this post was planted retro-actively back to this date and time].

NOTE that most of the links below are "broken" now and point to nothing useful!!!  Because they have "rolled-off" their listserv's landing-pages and into their archives (those that have archives). This is a main reason this blog was designed as a ONE-WEEK blog, whose primary purpose was real-time communication during the hurricane, not after it.

Day #5 The eye of Irene is just south of New York City

It is 9:15am and the eye of hurricane Irene is just a few miles south of New York City....


Scroll down through the items below, and click on the colored text links on the left side of an item, to jump to that item......

Vermont Birds ... discussion about possible hurricane birds in Vermont, by Bryan Pfeiffer
Vermont Birds ... mention of two useful sites for birding Irene, thanks to Bryan Pfeiffer!
Vermont Birds ... a very pleasant sense of humor, thanks to Paula Gills.

The Massachusetts Birding List ... two good posts by Marshall Iliff about where to look in Massachussetts.

Connecticut Birds ... SOOTY TERN at Fairfield Beach CT, from James Purcell.

Connecticut Birds ... BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL by Nick Bonomo and Julian Hough. and 50 RED-NECKED PHALAROPES by Frank Mantlik.

Connecticut Birds ... SOOTY TERN and LT JAEGER in CT, Nick Bonomo

Northern New York Birds ... a reminder for local birders to be alert for hurricane birds, from Dana Rohleder.

The New York Birding List ... Three feet of water covering Dune Road, Hampton Bays, Suffolk, NY, from Robert Adamo.

The New York Birding List ... BRIDLED TERN at Gilgo Beach LI, NY from Andrew Baksh, Pat Lindsay and Shai Mitra

The New York Birding List ... Central Park in New York City, by Peter Post.

The New York Birding List ... 4 BRIDLED TERNS and 2 SOOTY TERNS in East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY,   by Angus Wilson

New Jersey Birding ... WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD and 2 SOOTY TERNS near Cape May, Michael O'Brien, David La Puma, et al.

New Jersey Birding ... helping other people during this storm, by Harvey Tomlinson.

The Pennsylvania Birding List ... 2 SOOTY TERNS from PA, by Drew Weber

The Pennsylvania Birding List ... (LT?) JAEGER from Matt Sabatine, Drew Weber and Devich Farbotnik.

Delaware Birds ... 6 tern species but action has slowed, from Jeffrey Gordon.

Delaware Birds ... BRIDLED TERN, STORM PETREL,  Black Terns, from Jeffrey Gordon.

MDOsprey Birding List ... SOOTY TERN from Bill Hubick, Lutmerding, Feild, and King.

MDOsprey Birding List ... SOOTY TERN from Kevin Graff.

MDOsprey Birding List ... TROPICAL TERN (SPP) and LONG-TAILED JAEGER, from Bill Hubick.

Virginia Birding ... a fond remembrance of Roger Tory Peterson, from Harry Glasgow.

The Carolinas Birding List ... RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, from Chris Helms

The Carolinas Birding List ... RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, from Ali Iyoob

Birdbrains ... RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, from Roberto Torres

Day #5 Hurricane Irene scraping along the coast of DelMarVa and NewJersey

Hurricane Irene has been grazing along the coast line since the Carolinas, but now it seems to be headed straight for its main landfall in NY between New York City and central Long Island NY.   Therefore we are going to shift to a more detailed map for Irene's last hours over the ocean. We will use the WunderMap from WUnderground.com,  and a sample of that a few minutes after midnight on Sunday August 28th is shown here.... you can click on any of the images to enlarge the maps....

Map from WunderMap
This map is from WunderMap, and it is recommended that you click on this link to see the latest version... WunderMap Interactive Radar & Weather Stations : Weather Underground

Here is the WunderMap at 12:30am Sunday morning, showing most computer models' trajectories projecting the eye of the hurricane to hit New York City, perhaps around noon today/Sunday....


..

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Summary at end of Day #4 Saturday night 8/27

It is 9pm August 27th and Hurricane Irene is east of the Virginia coast. Many observers have found Black Terns and other good coastal birds in the last two days. Good birders in Florida, the Carolinas and Virginia in the last two days have also reported some of the classic "hurricane birds"of Sooty Tern, Bridled Tern, Brown Noddy and Frigatebird,  but the storm was too far East for it to give Georgia any similar species.

The next two days will be very interesting to see if any typical "hurricane birds" are reported from the next states to be touched by Irene, as it pushes up the coast line toward New York City and Long Island, which will apparently take a direct hit. Irene will then push into New England, probably hitting the Connecticut coast strongly. Be careful.

If electricity continues in CT this blog will continue throughout Sunday 8/28 and Monday also, monitoring about twenty listservs on the East Coast and Canada, and phone calls from NorthEast birding friends. If this site goes inactive it would mean that we lost electricity and the ability to connect to the internet.

As Nick Bonomo said here a few minutes ago... Connecticut Birds
it may be possible to do some SAFE post-storm birding Sunday afternoon, TBD.
If you do see anything outstanding on Sunday or Monday please post immediately on CTbirds or your local state bird list, and call other birders.

Please remember to put safety first, ahead of everything else.
Take care and Good night!

Day #4 Hurricane Irene east of the Carolinas

WHICH WILL BE THE NEXT STATES TO REPORT "HURRICANE BIRDS"?
LOOKS LIKE BRIDLED TERNS IN FLORIDA and THE CAROLINAS ARE THE FIRST OF THE DAY!  See several other hurricane birds in the items below in RED.


This update is as of 9 PM  Saturday   8/27

This map shows the cumulative wind history of Hurricane Irene, as of mid-day 8/27...



Here is the projected storm track as of 9 pm Saturday....8/27... you can click on it to enlarge...
the storm path has adjusted a bit west and the eye of the storm is apparently aiming directly at Manhattan in NYC!


Here is the track as of 5pm...


Here is the projected storm track as of 2pm...



Here is the trajectory as of 8am....




Hurricane Irene Birds - Maine birds | Google Groups ... comments on this blog and discussion about where to do hurricane birding, thanks to Peter Vickery.

some hurricane predictions and suggestions - Maine birds | Google Groups ... from Derek Lovitch, a new and very interesting blog, featuring Hurricane Irene currently....
Maine Outdoor Journal | Field Notes: Introducing the Gulf of Maine Bird Watch!

Rhode Island Birds ... squeezing in some pre-hurricane birding, before the beach areas are closed, by Jan St. Jean.

Connecticut Birds ... it may be possible to see rare species late Sunday, TBD, from Nick Bonomo.

Connecticut Birds ... our own 3pm update about this Hurricane Irene blog.  Another update forthcoming around 9pm tonight.




The New York Birding List ... Thanks to Mike Cooper for a list of three webcams which are giving almost real-time snapshot still ocean views...of coastal places which will be difficult to get to for a few days...
Gilgo- stills- refreshed evry second or so....
Gilgo Surf Cam - Bunger Surf Shop Surfcam of Gilgo Beach Long Island N.Y.
Shinnecock still picture updated every 15 minutes...
Webcam at Shinnecock Inlet, Long Island, New York USA
Montauk- watch about 20 seconds, then have to reload for an ad....    Montauk Surf Report and HD Surf Cam | SURFLINE.COM

Hudson Mohawk Birds ... history of storm birds around Albana, by Will Raup

Hudson Mohawk Birds ... reflections on hurricane birds, by Chad Witko

The New York Birding List ... Suffolk County parks closed on Long Island, from Mike Cooper.

The New York Birding List .. more discussion about where to go, from Jacob Drucker.

The New York Birding List ... where to go to see hurricane birds?? by Peter Post, Mike Cooper, Bob Lewis.

The New York Birding List ... Gateway closed question, from Steve Walter.

The New York Birding List ... more beach closures on eastern Long Island, by Eileen Schwinn, Don Riepe, Mike Cooper, David Klauber, etc.

The New York Birding List ... Several posts here indicate that most of the ocean beaches around western Long Island and NYC are being closed and asking birders and other visitors to leave.

The New York Birding List ... looks like most of the Long Island beaches will be closed and inaccessible, as per Angus Wilson.

The New York Birding List ... this hurricane blog gets some advertising on the New York birding list, thank to Peter Post.

New Jersey Birding ... three consecutive good posts about hurricane birding in NJ and especially around Cape May, by David La Puma, Steve Glynn, and Fred Virrazzi.  Good luck to all of you Sunday & Monday, and hopefully Cape May has some good birds.

MDOsprey Birding List ... no real hurricane birds in a sea-watch this afternoon, by Jim Stasz. This is the smart way to do a hurricane seawatch.... from inside a safe restaurant overlooking the ocean!  (-:

MDOsprey Birding List ... The MD bird listserv is active late today with questions and ideas about where to look for hurricane birds.

MDOsprey Birding List ... Royal, Caspian and Black Terns, but probably not truly hurricane birds, from  Jeff Shenot.

MDOsprey Birding List ... 11 Black Terns at 11:30am may be hurricane birds, by Jim Stasz.

MDOsprey Birding List ... Maryland discussion of possible hurricane bird species, by Phil Davis.

The West Virginia Birding List ... brief note on possible storm birds, by Matt Orsie.

Virginia Birding ... two SOOTY TERNS around 4-5pm, thanks to Mike Stinson, David Spears, and Evan Spears.

Virginia Birding ... two BRIDLED TERNS in a roost with Black, Caspian, Royal, Common, Forster's, and Sandwich Terns, thanks to Ned Brinkley.

Virginia Birding ... a hurricane "storm roost" forming in Virginia, by Ned Brinkley.

The Carolinas Birding List ... 3 SOOTY TERNS, thanks to Ali Iyoob.

The Carolinas Birding List ... SOOTY TERNS from Andrew Thornton and Kent Fiala.  Same birds located later by Steve Shultz... The Carolinas Birding List

The Carolinas Birding List ... thankful for the SOOTY TERN photos, by Harry Sell.

The Carolinas Birding List ... 2 BRIDLED TERNS from Derb Carter.

The Birding Lists Digest ... BRIDLED TERN in the Carolinas, by Derb Carter, thanks to a comment sent in by Jess.

The Birding Lists Digest ... SOOTY TERN at Mason Inlet, NC by Derb Carter.

The Carolinas Birding List ... more on the SOOTY TERN and BRIDLED TERN from Derb Carter.

The Carolinas Birding List ... southern parts of Carolinas already showing some post-hurricane weather, discussing hummers, not hurricane seabirds.

Georgia Birding ... nothing about hurricane birds from Georgia yet.

Florida Birds ... BRIDLED TERN in Florida around 9am, by Linda Most.

GOOD NEWS ABOUT THAT WHIMBREL.....
Florida Birds ... the hurricane Whimbrel appears to be alive and well today 8/27, as per email from Patrick Leary. See the map of the bird's position today 8/27...
seaturtle.org - Tracking - Chinquapin

Birdbrains ... Florida birders looking for hurricane birds late yesterday, but with little success, by Gary Davis.



Friday, August 26, 2011

Brown Noddy (aka Common Noddy)

One of our favorite "hurricane birds".
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia... Brown Noddy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Seen in South Carolina on August 26, 2011

Day #3 Hurricane Irene east of north Florida and Georgia

WILL ANY "HURRICANE BIRDS" BE REPORTED TODAY IN ANY STATE? 
YESSSS!   SOUTH CAROLINA IS #1 WITH BROWN NODDY, SOOTY TERN AND TWO MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRDS.  OR MAYBE FLORIDA WAS FIRST WITH ITS 40 SOOTY TERNS?
See the reported items below the maps.
THE TIME IS 11:00PM FRIDAY 8/26

Here is the projected storm track as of 8pm tonight Friday August 26th...



And here is the storm track as of 11am Friday morning...



Discussions - nf.birds | Google Groups ... nothing about the hurricane yet in Newfoundland.

Prince Edward Island Birders ... nothing about the hurricane yet.

Nova Scotia ... nothing yet about the hurricane.

The Ornitho-QC List ... the hurricane Whimbrel, in French.

Ontario Birding ... no hurricane posts yet.

New Brunswick ... nothing about the hurricane yet

Discussions - Maine birds | Google Groups ... interesting birds in Maine, but nothing about the hurricane yet.

Vermont Birds ... comments about the Whimbreal that flew into Hurricane Irene

New Hampshire Birds ... suggestions to search CT river and inland waters for hurricane birds, by Steve Mirick

The Massachusetts Birding List ... a good post by Marshall Iliff, including reference to his excellent eBird article...  Hurricane Irene en route — eBird

The Massachusetts Birding List ... additional refuges closed in MA

The Massachusetts Birding List ... Monomoy NWR closing for Irene, by Barbara Volkle. Plus Peter Trull's report of an adult Sabine's Gull on 8/25 (but not due to the hurricane).

Connecticut Birds ... seabirds and coast-birds in hurricanes, by Dennis Varza.

Connecticut Birds ... thoughts about birding on monday, by John Babington.

The New York Birding List ... John Bull's fascinating bird history of hurricanes around New York City, from 1878 to 1960 hurricanes, from Mike Cooper.

The New York Birding List ... a good article about hurricane birding, referenced by Doug Gochfeld...
Hurricane Irene en route — eBird ... an excellent article!

The New York Birding List ... some interesting hurricane history from a well-known "old-time hurricane birder", Peter Post, regarding some of the difficulties of birding after hurricanes.

New Jersey Birding ... The calm before the storm in NJ

Delaware Birds ... Bombay Hook NWR closing because of Hurricane Irene.

MDOsprey Birding List ... hoping for tropical terns in Maryland.

Virginia Birding ... no hurricane birds from Virginia yet.

THE CAROLINAS ARE GETTING "HURRICANE BIRDS"......click on the colored links on left...
The Carolinas Birding List ... BROWN NODDY in South Carolina. Thanks also to Andrew Dasinger for collaborating on this stuff.

The Carolinas Birding List ... 2 MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRDS, SOOTY TERN IN SC.

The Carolinas Birding List ... wild weather in North Carolina at 7pm

Georgia Birding ... search for hurricane birds around Jekyll Island GA not successful.

Birdbrains ... Two posts from Florida today, where searches for "hurricane birds" were NOT successful, by Gary Davis and by Michael Brothers.

Florida Birds ... One Long-tailed Jaeger but not other pelagics or hurricane birds, by Michael Brothers.

Florida Birds ... 40 SOOTY TERNS, around 8am, by Bob Richter.  I overlooked this Florida report until Matt Malin brought it to my attention tonight....thank you Matt. This might be the first report of any Irene "hurricane birds".


SEVERAL MORE ARTICLES ABOUT THE WHIMBREL FLYING THROUGH IRENE...
Bird survives rough ride through Hurricane Irene
Did This Bird Survive a Flight Through Hurricane Irene?
William & Mary - Whimbrel successfully negotiates most severe part of Hurricane Irene
And here is another Whimbrel record flight in 2008...
Winnie the Whimbrel

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Day #2 Irene is in the Bahamas east of south Florida

UPDATE:  NO REPORTS OF ANY "HURRICANE BIRDS" YET AS OF 8/25  11PM

Thursday's 11pm projected storm track map, with Irene still headed for New York City...



Today's 5pm projected storm track map shows a bit more drift back to the west, suggesting that Irene might scrape right along the coast from Virginia up into New York City and then into New England...



Today's 8am projected storm track map shows a slight adjustment back to the west since yesterday, pointing it toward western Long Island NY and New England...


It is 11pm now and bird lists today started to discuss Hurricane Irene, but there were no reports of "hurricane birds" (birds probably impacted/transported by the hurricane, especially the less common species and those displaced from other locations).  All coastal bird lists will be reviewed again tomorrow, from Florida up through the Maritime Provinces.  Meanwhile click on the blue/purple-colored links below to jump to Thursday's posts, and then you can use your browser's "back button" to return to this site....

Nova Scotia ... the first Nova Scotia post about the oncoming hurricane Irene.

Hurricane Irene - birds and more - Maine birds | Google Groups ... Maine birders also expressing safety concerns about Hurricane Irene.

The Massachusetts Birding List ... echoing that Whimbrel radar tracking story from VA and thinking about Sooty Terns.

Connecticut Birds ... a long article: suggestions on birding Hurricane Irene, by Nick Bonomo

Connecticut Birds ... Some hurricane birding tips from Frank Mantlik and Ned Brinkley.

Connecticut Birds ... some thoughts about hurricanes and birds, by Paul Carrier.

The Cayuga Birding List ... a reminder to be alert for possible hurricane birds, from Chris Tessaglia-Hymes.

New Jersey Birding ... "Hurricane Irene and birding potential", plus the several posts directly below this one on the NJBirds list.

New Jersey Birding ... will Kirtland's Warbler be impacted by Hurricane Irene?

New Jersey Birding ... "Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge closed until further notice"

New Jersey Birding ... where should a birder be on Monday morning? by Mike Gochfeld

New Jersey Birding ... the New Jersey shore is at risk of a deadly storm surge

Delaware Birds ... concerns about Irene threatening Delaware.

MDOsprey Birding List ... remembering a hurricane that hit Assateague

Virginia Birding ... satellite transmitter tracking a Whimbrel as it flies through Irene today! Amazing!!

Virginia Birding ... more deep concern about this hurricane!

Virginia Birding ... could this be the first sign of Irene approaching Virginia? Plus a post about damages and safety issues.

The Carolinas Birding List ... Serious concern in the Carolinas

Georgia Birding ... a Georgia discussion about possible birds from Hurricane Irene.


Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges will be closed because of the hurricane...
"From: Janis Nepshinsky/R5/FWS/DOI
Date: 08/25/2011 10:53AM
Subject: Press Release for Closure of Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges due to projected path of Hurricane Irene
Please see attached and copied press release.
Please call if you have any questions.
Thanks, Janis
cell 787.6298
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
News Release
Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex
Block Island NWR John H. Chafee NWR at Pettaquamscutt Cove Ninigret NWR Sachuest Point NWR Trustom Pond NWR
50 Bend Road, Charlestown, RI 02813                                401/364-9124       Fax: 401/364-0170
For Immediate Release                                                                                       August 25, 2011
For Further Information Contact:
Janis Nepshinsky, Visitor Services Manager 401 364-9124 or
Charlie Vandemoer, Refuge Manager: 401.364.9124x11
Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges Closed Due To Hurricane Irene’s Project Path
With Hurricane Irene projected to hit the northeast coast this weekend, the Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) will be closed beginning Saturday, August 27, 2011 until further notice.  Forecasters predict that the Rhode Island coast will experience surging tides, high sustained winds of 75 miles per hours and severe flooding.
We regret this emergency closure and we will re-open as soon as conditions are safe, says Janis Nepshinsky, Visitor Services Manager.
The Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges consists of Block Island NWR, John H. Chafee Refuge NWR in Narragansett/South Kingstown, Ninigret NWR in Charlestown, Sachuest Point NWR in Middletown, and Trustom Pond NWR in South Kingstown.  Please visit www.fws.gov/ninigret/complex.
For information on when the refuges will be reopened, please call 364.9124, extension 48 or visit Facebook, keyword Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
*********
Janis Nepshinsky
Visitor Services Manager
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex
50 Bend Road, Charlestown, RI  02813
401.364.9124 extension 28,  Fax: 401.364.0170
Website:  http://www.fws.gov/ninigret/complex/
Facebook:  keyword: Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex
"

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Day #1 -- Introduction

UPDATE:  NO REPORTS OF ANY "HURRICANE BIRDS" YET AS OF 8/24 9PM

This site will provide daily links to internet nature reports related to Hurricane Irene 2011.  We know that hurricanes are very dangerous, damaging and costly. This site is NOT encouraging anybody to go out and endanger themselves to see birds or the storm itself. Even after the storm there can be dangers, such as electric wires on the wet ground. This site, however, will focus mostly on bird-related changes caused by this storm, including southern and tropical birds which may be blown north by the winds. We will monitor all the daily posts on the twenty East Coast bird lists from Florida up to Maine and the Canadian Maritimes. It will be interesting to see how this storm is reflected on these twenty birding lists.

Here is a snapshot of the estimated storm track as of 8pm August 24, 2011.....slightly to the east of the projected track last night....

Click to expand this image

There will be plenty of hurricane-related posts on the East Coast bird lists over the next 7 days, and here are the first several of them....click on the blue-colored links to jump to those posts, and then you can use your browser's "back button" to return to this site...

New Brunswick ... the first hurricane related post from New Brunswick, Canada

No hurricane posts from Maine yet.

No hurricane posts from Vermont yet.

No hurricane posts from New Hampshire yet.

The Massachusetts Birding List  Hurricane Irene could be very damaging

No hurricane posts from Rhode Island yet.

Connecticut Birds  Hurricane Irene appears to be aiming at us

No hurricane posts from New York yet.

No hurricane posts from New Jersey yet.

No hurricane posts from Delaware yet.

MDOsprey Birding List  Starting to think about the hurricane hitting Maryland

Virginia Birding  First post about the hurricane from Virginia

The Carolinas Birding List  No hurricane posts from the Carolinas yet.

Georgia Birding  Georgia is starting to think about the hurricane, as per this posting....

"Subject: Hurricane Irene Alert - 
Possible Storm-Blown Pelagic Birds - Maybe Friday through Sunday or so!
From: Mark McShane
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:20:01 -0400
Hi All,
Hurricane Irene bears watching and is slated to come up the Georgia coast
Friday and Saturday. Depending on the actual track of the storm we may get
some pelagic species storm-blown onto the Georgia coast and even inland
Friday-Sunday, or even later, as the birds collect themselves and
hopefully head back out to sea! ...
Also, here's a link to Lydia Thompson's interesting report of 8/22/2008
concerning storm-blown pelagic species on the Georgia coast then:
Coastal Georgia Birding: Hanging on by toenails
It's possible that some Georgia inland lakes may end up attracting and
holding storm-tossed pelagic species from this storm for a short while!"

Birdbrains ... some first hurricane thoughts from Florida


MORE TOMORROW!

Monday, August 22, 2011

Experimenting with the full text from CT birds list from 8/22-8/28

EXPERIMENTING WITH THE FULL TEXT FROM AUG 22-28, 2011 FROM CTBIRDS

Yellow or Green indicated hurricane-related posts....
Red may be used to high-light some species....
This long post is not completed.....work in progress....


===============================

From mswanhall at earthlink.net  Mon Aug 22 07:10:36 2011
From: mswanhall at earthlink.net (Marty Swanhall)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 07:10:36 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Cape Cod Brown Booby
Message-ID: <6291F905ECBB4620962214AF1380A1D2@SwanhallPC>

>From Greg Hirth and [MASSBIRD]...

Brown booby present now 6am. Seen since 5:30.

From dennisvz at optonline.net  Mon Aug 22 08:01:42 2011
From: dennisvz at optonline.net (Dennis Varza)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 08:01:42 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Reading 7
Message-ID: <864B9ABF-28E4-4D5E-8093-490E75096DE4@optonline.net>

Regarding the Great Horned Owl ?Screech?
It appears that they do make such a noise. It seems that it is used
to communicate between parents and young, hence it is not often heard.

Reading 7
Yellow-billed Cuckoo

The Yellow-billed Cuckoo scarcely deserves a position with the
songsters, for his note is almost entirely without pitch. His near
relative the Balck-billed Cuckoo is by far the better singer;
nevertheless, the Yellow-billed?s attempts at rythm are not without
merit, for he can give us a ritardanto (ritardano a gradual decrease
in tempo) as perfect as that of the Chat.

There is very little to say about the Yellow-bill?s music?perhapse
the less said the better. Mr. Cheney sums up the matter in these few
words.: ?The Yellow-breasted Chat exhibits the same rhythmic
peculiarity in his chattings, and so does the Woodpecker drumming on
a board or dry limb for the mere sound of it; but in quality nothing
can be compared with the slopping performance, unless it be that of
the loose-mouthed hound lapping from a pan of milk.? It is evident
that no one can improve on that description,

It begins with a series of gurgling sounds which rapidly merge into
one another, and then runs down in a slower and slower succession of
syllables sounding like cowlp, cowlp, cowlp, cowlp, cowlp. It is a
perfect ritardando which could not be excelled by the Chat himself
who is an expert at that sort of thing.

(Personal note: I have found that imitating the clucking sound by
clicking one?s tongue often, not always, causes the bird to show
himself)

Dennis Varza
Fairfield.


From mlr342 at hotmail.com  Mon Aug 22 08:08:33 2011
From: mlr342 at hotmail.com (Matthew Rymkiewicz)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 08:08:33 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] (no subject)
Message-ID: <SNT115-W61E2FE6A3BDFA2E21847E0892F0@phx.gbl>

It?s the right way to be healthy... http://tier-spezi.com/com.page.php?aCID=92ax0
   

From rmharvey at snet.net  Mon Aug 22 09:35:26 2011
From: rmharvey at snet.net (Roy Harvey)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 06:35:26 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper, Rocky Hill Meadows
Message-ID: <1314020126.719.YahooMailClassic@web81501.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

I just (9:30) had a call from Paul Desjardins.

A Baird's Sandpiper just flew in at Rocky Hill Meadows in Rocky Hill.  If I got his description right there is a pool near the first major intersection as you drive in (where you can take a left), and it was in there.


Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT


From sunrisebirding at aol.com  Mon Aug 22 12:08:59 2011
From: sunrisebirding at aol.com (Sunrisebirding)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:08:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] FALL MIGRATION BIRD WALKS start August 24!
In-Reply-To: <260317613.376261314028581951.JavaMail.root@mbs15.homesteadmail.com>
References: <260317613.376261314028581951.JavaMail.root@mbs15.homesteadmail.com>
Message-ID: <8CE2EFCEF97713D-CC4-512ED@webmail-d037.sysops.aol.com>

Hello Birders!
Fall migration is underway and Luke Tiller and Julian Hough are
offering a series of guided Bird Walks!  Details and registration at
http://www.sunrisebirding.com/walks.htm  Please forward to interested
birders!

=============================================================
FALL SHOREBIRD WALKS WITH JULIAN HOUGH
With shorebirds, herons, egrets and other species on the move, Sunrise
Birding
is offering a series of evening walks at Sandy Point, West Haven - one
of the
state's premier coastal birding spots. Among a variety of species, we
will be
focusing mainly on shorebirds to help you improve your identification
skills -
learn how size, structure and habitat can help your identification.
Evening is a
great time of visit Sandy Point, so If you want to get out in the field
for some
relaxing evening birding and have fun with like-minded birders, please
join us
on one of the walks:

EVENINGS:
 Wednesday, August 24: 6-8 PM
 Wednesday, August 31: 6-8 PM
 Wednesday, September 7: 6-8 PM

Mornings
 Saturday, September 10: 8-10 AM

=============================================================
FALL BIRD WALKS WITH LUKE TILLER
Sunday August 28: Westport Shorebirds, Grace Salmon & Sherwood Island,
1 PM
Saturday September 17: Trout Brook Valley, Easton, 7:30 AM
Sunday September 25: Westport Warblering, 7:30 AM
Saturday October 8: Allen?s Meadows and Secret Hotspots in Wilton, 7:30
AM
Saturday October 29: Sparrow Big Day ? Allen?s Meadows to Sherwood
Island, 7:30 AM

=============================================================
The fee for guided Bird Walks is $10 per person and online registration
is
required. A confirmation with directions and meeting location will be
emailed to
registered participants a few days before the event. Please review the
terms and
conditions prior to registering.  Participants are encouraged to dress
for the
weather, bring binoculars, insect repellent, water, and a spotting
scope (if you
have one). Watch for our fall warbler and hawk walks coming soon!

Gina Nichol
Sunrise Birding, LLC
Worldwide Bird Watching Tours & Wildlife Safaris
P.O. Box 274
Cos Cob, CT 06807-0274   USA
Office: 1.203.453.6724
Web site: http://www.sunrisebirding.com




From nbonomo at gmail.com  Mon Aug 22 14:42:29 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 14:42:29 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] 8/22 - Hammo & Sandy Pt
Message-ID: <CABgXtNdpKQQsHHO-Lb=jEmZ1P4-j0948+ksRd4DzCLm_28Fiyw@mail.gmail.com>

As expected, it appears that overall shorebird numbers along the coast
are down following last night's cold front passage. Hammonasset Beach
SP was quiet with a PECTORAL SANDPIPER being the only notable
shorebird. There was a diurnal migration going on, with a few
Bobolinks and many swallows moving down the coast. Best was a single
CLIFF SWALLOW.

Sandy Point at low tide was very quiet. Nothing of note and shorebird
numbers were minimal, including a grand total of 9 peep (5 Semis, 4
Leasts). There was a stiff NW breeze so I'd expect that Lighthouse Pt
had its first trickle of hawks today.

On the upside, decent numbers of Common Terns and Laughing Gulls at
both locations.

We'll have to keep an eye on Hurricane Irene and see what, if any,
effects we feel from her.

Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com


From petermgreen at hotmail.com  Mon Aug 22 15:17:51 2011
From: petermgreen at hotmail.com (Tina and Peter Green)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 19:17:51 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Westport WW Scoter Still Here
Message-ID: <BLU145-W202BFB3D551C1C2B51C2EDAF2F0@phx.gbl>


8/22/11 -Westport - Compo Beach- White-winged Scoter continues just five feet from the beach today,preening a bit and looking like he's not going anywhere.  Cockenoe Island had 41 American Oystercatchers. Good numbers of shorebirds around for Westport including Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers,Least and Semipalmated Sandpipers,Ruddy Turnstones,Spotted Sandpiper on the beach and the sandbars.Also lots of Common Terns and Laughing Gulls still around and a Forster's Tern at the mouth of the Saugatuck River.

Sherwood Island SP - Quiet except for 53 Killdeer just off the rotary area and a small group of four Blue-gray Gnatcatchers moving through. I am seeing lots of juvenile Cedar Waxwings and  had 30+ Chimney Swifts on the move this morning.

Tina Green
Westport

   

From htg1523 at att.net  Mon Aug 22 15:55:09 2011
From: htg1523 at att.net (Hank Golet)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 15:55:09 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Griswold Pt
Message-ID: <9B3F6EF49763436B869E6E9FE9A2B7A3@D5YDTZ61>

>From Hank Golet
8/22 Old Lyme, Griswold Pt,  Late this morning, dead low tide, on the sandbar that is just west of the end of the point.  There is a red ball channel marker near by.  3 FORSTER'S TERNS, 4 BLACK TERNS, 1 CASPIAN TERN

 

From jhannan at audubon.org  Mon Aug 22 15:59:51 2011
From: jhannan at audubon.org (Hannan, John)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:59:51 -0700
Subject: [CT Birds] Big Year
In-Reply-To: <1313688215.079523004@webmail.fineartstudioonline.com>
References: <1313688215.079523004@webmail.fineartstudioonline.com>
Message-ID: <8BA495A68578C64397734BAD70696E7A1289AD86FA@VA3DIAXVS6C1.RED001.local>

Last week there were a couple of posts about the upcoming movie, The Big Year.  Those who read the book already know the plot is very funny and we will all probably recognize one or two birding traits of our own in the movie's main characters.

The film makers do want this to be a movie birders will both enjoy and be able to use to recruit new members to our ranks and organizations.  They consulted with both Cornell Lab and National Audubon on how to make scenes and species as realistic and true to geographic locations as possible.

The movie has turned Steve Martin into a committed birder too!

For more info on the film here is a website:

http://big-year-movie-trailer.blogspot.com/



John Hannan
Senior Director of Strategic Gifts for the Atlantic Flyway
&
Director of Development for Audubon in Connecticut
National Audubon Society
613 Riversville Road
Greenwich, CT 06831

Tel 203-869-5272 ext. 234
Cell 917-293-8302
Fax 203-869-4437

jhannan at audubon.org

www.audubonct.org
www.audubon.org/atlantic-flyways




From mswanhall at earthlink.net  Mon Aug 22 16:04:57 2011
From: mswanhall at earthlink.net (martin swanhall)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 16:04:57 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Subject: [CT Birds] Big Year
Message-ID: <26722639.1314043497731.JavaMail.root@mswamui-backed.atl.sa.earthlink.net>

Not bad for Steve Mrrtin - comedian, actor, film write, novelist, Grammy Award Winning banjoist, and now a birder.

He is truly a WILD AND CRAZY GUY!!!

Marty in Woodbury


-----Original Message-----
>From: "Hannan, John" <jhannan at audubon.org>
>Sent: Aug 22, 2011 3:59 PM
>To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Big Year
>
>Last week there were a couple of posts about the upcoming movie, The Big Year.  Those who read the book already know the plot is very funny and we will all probably recognize one or two birding traits of our own in the movie's main characters.
>
>The film makers do want this to be a movie birders will both enjoy and be able to use to recruit new members to our ranks and organizations.  They consulted with both Cornell Lab and National Audubon on how to make scenes and species as realistic and true to geographic locations as possible.
>
>The movie has turned Steve Martin into a committed birder too!
>
>For more info on the film here is a website:
>
>http://big-year-movie-trailer.blogspot.com/
>
>
>
>John Hannan
>Senior Director of Strategic Gifts for the Atlantic Flyway
>&
>Director of Development for Audubon in Connecticut
>National Audubon Society
>613 Riversville Road
>Greenwich, CT 06831
>
>Tel 203-869-5272 ext. 234
>Cell 917-293-8302
>Fax 203-869-4437
>
>jhannan at audubon.org
>
>www.audubonct.org
>www.audubon.org/atlantic-flyways
>
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org





From Leslie.Meredith at simonandschuster.com  Mon Aug 22 17:04:35 2011
From: Leslie.Meredith at simonandschuster.com (Meredith, Leslie)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 17:04:35 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] The Big Year
In-Reply-To: <8BA495A68578C64397734BAD70696E7A1289AD86FA@VA3DIAXVS6C1.RED001.local>
References: <1313688215.079523004@webmail.fineartstudioonline.com>
<8BA495A68578C64397734BAD70696E7A1289AD86FA@VA3DIAXVS6C1.RED001.local>
Message-ID: <79EF7891C278C24E8E7DB5580B2B4A6A0137454E32@NYDCMX24.cbs.ad.cbs.net>

I've refrained from posting about the movie on this list because I edited the book, but since 2 folks have mentioned the book-movie connection (thank you!), I can also mention that one of the 3 birders featured in the book, Greg Miller, who is a professional guide, was also brought in to consult on set.  He has some fun posts about his time in V'couver on this site: http://www.gregmillerbirding.com/about/

The trailer IS coming soon, post-Labor Day!

-----Original Message-----
From: ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org [mailto:ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org] On Behalf Of Hannan, John
Sent: Monday, August 22, 2011 4:00 PM
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Big Year

Last week there were a couple of posts about the upcoming movie, The Big Year.  Those who read the book already know the plot is very funny and we will all probably recognize one or two birding traits of our own in the movie's main characters.

The film makers do want this to be a movie birders will both enjoy and be able to use to recruit new members to our ranks and organizations.  They consulted with both Cornell Lab and National Audubon on how to make scenes and species as realistic and true to geographic locations as possible.

The movie has turned Steve Martin into a committed birder too!

For more info on the film here is a website:

http://big-year-movie-trailer.blogspot.com/



John Hannan
Senior Director of Strategic Gifts for the Atlantic Flyway
&
Director of Development for Audubon in Connecticut
National Audubon Society
613 Riversville Road
Greenwich, CT 06831

Tel 203-869-5272 ext. 234
Cell 917-293-8302
Fax 203-869-4437

jhannan at audubon.org

www.audubonct.org
www.audubon.org/atlantic-flyways



_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org


From rmharvey at snet.net  Mon Aug 22 18:23:12 2011
From: rmharvey at snet.net (Roy Harvey)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 15:23:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] More Tagged Gulls to Watch For
Message-ID: <1314051792.65625.YahooMailClassic@web81505.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

I was asked to pass along the message that can be found below.

Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT


Dear gull enthusiasts,

I am a researcher at Acadia University working with Dr. Phil Taylor on a new project studying the movements and migrations of gulls from Sable Island, Nova Scotia.  In June 2011 we banded Herring Gulls with PINK alpha-numeric bands as well as PINK wing-tags which are quite obvious in flight or on land.  We also banded Great Black-backed Gull chicks with GREEN alpha-numeric bands.

Reports of these birds throughout the year will greatly enhance the success of this project to document the movements and migrations of gulls from this far offshore colony.

Please visit my blog where you can learn more about the project and find links on how to report marked birds that you've spotted.  I will be posting photos and stories of re-sighted birds on this blog, so sign up for e-mail updates.

http://sableislandgulls.wordpress.com/

Please contact me if you see these or other marked gulls over the fall and winter.  The blog also contains links to other gull banding projects.

Sincerely,

Rob Ronconi,   rronconi at yahoo.com
Postdoctoral Researcher
Dept. of Biology, Acadia University


From philiprusch at charter.net  Mon Aug 22 19:35:24 2011
From: philiprusch at charter.net (philiprusch at charter.net)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 19:35:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Mansfield Hollow shorebirds 8/22
Message-ID: <19c9dde0.f7fd9.131f3d93890.Webtop.46@charter.net>


The water level at the Mansfield Hollow Reservoir as seen from the dam
on Rt 6 in Windham has been lowered again.  This evening I saw the
following:

Great Blue Heron 7
Great Egret  1
Killdeer 26
Lesser Yellowlegs 4
Solitary Sandpiper 11
Spotted Sandpiper  3
Least Sandpiper 34
Semipal Sandpiper  3
White-rumped Sandpiper 1

Interestingly there was not a single shorebird on the airport side of
the dam

Phil Rusch
Chaplin

From bpropen at gmail.com  Mon Aug 22 20:00:35 2011
From: bpropen at gmail.com (Beverly Propen)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 20:00:35 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] screech owl
Message-ID: <CAMcNzanZemAaXPcwpf5eA2Z4JyDs_g-f0thj1QRQivrBtD9PoQ@mail.gmail.com>

8/22  7:50-7:55PM  Screech owl singing in my backyard!  First for my yard,
first for my Orange list and a lifer for me.  What a melodious song.
Bev Propen, Orange

From givenrandy at gmail.com  Mon Aug 22 20:06:11 2011
From: givenrandy at gmail.com (Randy Given)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2011 20:06:11 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Mystery Bird addendum
Message-ID: <CABzQ++WBzaBQ=Ud_Wpy2Oh0iY0RLi2woh9w6qJ6mrrhFLj+KGA@mail.gmail.com>

I looked at my photos again and I did have one of the bird flying away:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/63844070 at N03/6071543744/in/photostream/

Unfortunately, the angle on the tail is opposite of what I'd like.

Randy Given


From chris.grimm at globepequot.com  Tue Aug 23 09:11:16 2011
From: chris.grimm at globepequot.com (Grimm, Chris)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 09:11:16 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Westport Nighthawks 8/23
In-Reply-To: <1313808248.44074.YahooMailClassic@web81505.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
References: <1313808248.44074.YahooMailClassic@web81505.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Message-ID: <22475359361E9440B90146F4BF3449D9071E3B0B@MTCEBEW101.internal.morris.com>

I only arrived home at about 6:45pm, so may have missed more earlier,
but between 6:50 and 7:00 last night I saw about 18 nighthawks in three
smallish groups circling their way through - above the Greens Farms area
of Westport.  I didn't see any more after 7:00.


From petermgreen at hotmail.com  Tue Aug 23 10:48:16 2011
From: petermgreen at hotmail.com (Tina and Peter Green)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 14:48:16 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] WW Scoter plus
Message-ID: <BLU145-W239642C8986DE7EECE0F3AAF2E0@phx.gbl>


8/23/11 - Westport - Compo Beach - White-winged Scoter continues just off the beach (today with a beach umbrella and cooler),31 Semipalmated Plovers,4 Ruddy Turnstones,,5 Semipalmated Sandpipers,2 Least Sandpipers

Sherwood Island SP - An almost constant movement of Barn and Tree Swallows,Chimney Swifts and Eastern Kingbirds heading west along with 2 Common Nighthawks this morning between 8-9:30am

Tina Green
Westport


    

From gswilliams9 at yahoo.com  Tue Aug 23 10:59:24 2011
From: gswilliams9 at yahoo.com (Glenn Williams)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 07:59:24 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Bluff Point 8/23 AM
Message-ID: <1314111564.75790.YahooMailClassic@web161308.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>

from Nick Bonomo, Jerry Connolly, and Glenn Williams:
8/23 - Groton, Bluff Point State Park -- DICKCISSEL, WILSON'S WARBLER, 5 BOBOLINK 400 warblers of 13 species.

Other birds of note - Worm-eating Warbler and 3 Warbling Vireo - not common at the park for morning flight, 50 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, an estimated 220 American Redstarts - seemed to be about 80% of the total warblers IDed so probably more than 220.? A possible Cerulean Warbler got away.? Complete list below:

Canada Goose? 12
Mute Swan? 2
American Black Duck? 4
Mallard? 2
Double-crested Cormorant? 3
Great Blue Heron? 1
Osprey? 2
Greater Yellowlegs? 1
Laughing Gull? 1
Ring-billed Gull? 2
Herring Gull? 4
Rock Pigeon? 2
Mourning Dove? 8
Chimney Swift? 18
Ruby-throated Hummingbird? 12
Belted Kingfisher? 1
Downy Woodpecker? 3
Eastern Wood-Pewee? 4
Least Flycatcher? 1
Empidonax sp.? 4
Eastern Phoebe? 2
Eastern Kingbird? 7
Warbling Vireo? 3
Red-eyed Vireo? 5
Blue Jay? 4
American Crow? 6
Purple Martin? 4
Tree Swallow? 2
Barn Swallow? 1
Tufted Titmouse? 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher? 50
Veery? 1
American Robin? 16
Gray Catbird? 10
Northern Mockingbird? 4
European Starling? 2
Cedar Waxwing? 8
Worm-eating Warbler? 1
Blue-winged Warbler? 3
Black-and-white Warbler? 35
Common Yellowthroat? 4
American Redstart? 220
Northern Parula? 2
Magnolia Warbler? 12
Yellow Warbler? 10
Chestnut-sided Warbler? 4
Prairie Warbler? 1
Black-throated Green Warbler? 1
Canada Warbler? 2
Wilson's Warbler? 1
warbler sp.? 100
Eastern Towhee? 10
Song Sparrow? 1
Northern Cardinal? 4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak? 1
Dickcissel? 1
Bobolink? 5
Red-winged Blackbird? 12
Brown-headed Cowbird? 8
Baltimore Oriole? 3
American Goldfinch? 8

Glenn Williams
Mystic

From mjwarner at optonline.net  Tue Aug 23 11:15:18 2011
From: mjwarner at optonline.net (Mike Warner)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 11:15:18 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Wilton:Bobolinks
Message-ID: <9D5DDDD4D0204A7587C6493B3D766065@OfficePC>


8/23/11 - Allens Meadow -  5 Bobolinks, 3 Eastern Kingbirds, 2 Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, 1 Osprey, 1 juvenile Broad-Winged Hawk.

Mike Warner
Wilton, CT.

From paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com  Tue Aug 23 11:22:49 2011
From: paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com (Paul Desjardins)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 11:22:49 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Windsor
Message-ID: <62CA47B3-2A4A-4B65-BF74-5030A62CDDD5@gmail.com>

This morning at Northwest Park 8 Black Vultures but almost no migration with only migrants being a Chesnut Sided
Warbler and a male Canada Warbler. Should have gone to Bluff Point this morning!

From sffaulkner at comcast.net  Tue Aug 23 11:52:43 2011
From: sffaulkner at comcast.net (Sarah Faulkner)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 11:52:43 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Pelagic & Unusual Birds question
Message-ID: <FBBBF353E81E46C8B6938D02E3C48BB6@SarahPC>


I've been watching the weather forecast, and it seems that Hurricane Irene may pay us a visit here this weekend.


If I were to spend a half-day birding somewhere along the shore in CT or RI  (not enough time to get to the Cape), what would be the BEST place(s) to look for pelagics/interesting species that might be blown in?  


Sarah Faulkner
Collinsville, CT



____________________________________________________________________________
If you want to build a ship, don't herd people together to collect wood and don't assign them
tasks and work but rather, teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea."
                           -- Antoine de Saint-Exupery

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Tue Aug 23 11:57:34 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 11:57:34 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Pelagic & Unusual Birds question
In-Reply-To: <FBBBF353E81E46C8B6938D02E3C48BB6@SarahPC>
References: <FBBBF353E81E46C8B6938D02E3C48BB6@SarahPC>
Message-ID: <CABgXtNcX42CsVfxjMojMHoQ+jrPqsc0Php-FTKbuRiFJVenHgA@mail.gmail.com>


Hi Sarah,


This all depends on storm track. With so much time between now and
then, so many things can change, and the track is far from certain. As
we get closer to the weekend, I'm sure several of us will be
speculating on potential birds and where to go to look for them.


Generally speaking though, you want a point of land that sticks into
LI Sound such as (east to west) Stonington Pt, Enders Island,
Cornfield Pt, Meigs Pt, Stratford Pt, Shippan Pt, etc etc.


Nick


Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com



On Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 11:52 AM, Sarah Faulkner <sffaulkner at comcast.net> wrote:
> I've been watching the weather forecast, and it seems that Hurricane Irene may pay us a visit here this weekend.
>
> If I were to spend a half-day birding somewhere along the shore in CT or RI ?(not enough time to get to the Cape), what would be the BEST place(s) to look for pelagics/interesting species that might be blown in?
>
> Sarah Faulkner
> Collinsville, CT
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________
> If you want to build a ship, don't herd people together to collect wood and don't assign them
> tasks and work but rather, teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea."
> ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? -- Antoine de Saint-Exupery
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>


From chbarnjr at gmail.com  Tue Aug 23 12:50:29 2011
From: chbarnjr at gmail.com (charles barnard jr)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 12:50:29 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] peregrine falcon carrying a fish
Message-ID: <CAEhpbrWN7gbQn1icw5uk7-=avdbs_DbHbCrCOyV=7nn=S1NcMw@mail.gmail.com>

This  morning, at the McKinney refuge in Stratford,  I watched as an
immature Peregrine Falcon stole a menhaden from an Osprey in flight.
After a few seconds of carrying the fish away, the peregrine dropped it into
the marsh grasses, circled over it once and moved on. Maybe the fish was too
heavy for it.  I had never seen a peregrine going for a fish before.

From semismart9 at aol.com  Tue Aug 23 14:12:09 2011
From: semismart9 at aol.com (semismart9 at aol.com)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 14:12:09 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Lighthouse Point - 2011-08-23 .. KINGBIRDS
Message-ID: <8CE2FD74EB97E49-17CC-8F9@webmail-d062.sysops.aol.com>



I spent the morning from 7:10 AM until 11:20 AM at Lighthouse Point. Lynn James was there to help count. There was a wonderful North Wind at a scale of 3 , the cloud cover was excellent, and we did have birds.........

There were actually 3 migrating hawks... 1 Osprey up high and flying Southwest,  1 Sharp-shinned Hawk, and 1 American Kestrel.

The other birds were incredible this morning...!!

We had 1 Olive-Sided Flycatcher in the Flicker Tree.
One Greater Yellow-legs and 2 Killdeer flew over the site, as well as 6 Least Sandpipers.

Bobolinks were heard..... 75  were seen and counted.
Red-winged Blackbirds... 875
Chimney Swifts... 295

Eastern Kingbirds...  605..  This was the most ever seen by Lynn and I.  We had 2 different flocks of 70 birds, 1 flock of 60 birds, 2 of     30+ birds, and several flocks in the 15 - 20 range count. This was even stranger than the day Greg and I had the big hummingbird day.

Bill Banks



From semismart9 at aol.com  Tue Aug 23 14:17:08 2011
From: semismart9 at aol.com (semismart9 at aol.com)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 14:17:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Fwd: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebird Report #5 - Photos
In-Reply-To: <BLU0-SMTP910383EA2994C156A55E5BAB2E0@phx.gbl>
References: <BLU0-SMTP910383EA2994C156A55E5BAB2E0@phx.gbl>
Message-ID: <8CE2FD8010C25D3-17CC-978@webmail-d062.sysops.aol.com>







-----Original Message-----
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron at SYMPATICO.CA>
To: SHOREBIRDS <SHOREBIRDS at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
Sent: Mon, Aug 22, 2011 10:12 pm
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebird Report #5 - Photos


This is my fifth and final report for the period 11 to 14 August 2011 at North
oint on the southwest coast of James Bay, Ontario, and includes sightings from
earby Longridge Point from Mark Peck and Little Piskwamish Point from Doug
cRae and Barb Charlton. The OMNR chopper flew survey crews from the three camps
o Moosonee on 14 August. We took the Polar Bear Express train from Moosonee to
ochrane on 15th and drove home to southern Ontario on 16th. Shorebird surveys
re a partnership of the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), Ontario Ministry of Natural
esources (OMNR), Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and Moose Cree First Nation
MCFN). The Longridge crew was Mark Peck (ROM), Roy John, Emily Rondel and
ntonio Coral. The Little Piskwamish crew was Don Sutherland (OMNR), Doug McRae,
arb Charlton and Ron Ridout. The North Point crew was Mike McMurtry (OMNR),
ean Iron, Aus Taverner and Minnie Sutherland (MCFN).
SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: A combined total of 27 shorebird species was recorded
or the three camps.
Black-bellied Plover: 56 on 13th at North Point, 28 on 12th at Little
iskwamish, up to 50 daily at Longridge.
American Golden-Plover: 1 molting adult on 11th and 2 on 13th at Little
iskwamish.
Semipalmated Plover: 29 on 12th, including first juvenile, at North Point, 52 on
3th at Little Piskwamish.
Solitary Sandpiper: 4 on 11th at Little Piskwamish.
Greater Yellowlegs: 451 on 11th at North Point (70% juveniles) and 148 on 11th
t Little Piskwamish.
Lesser Yellowlegs: 309 on 11th at North Point (80% juveniles) and 691 mostly
uveniles on 11th at Little Piskwamish.
Whimbrel: 6 on 11th at North Point.
Hudsonian Godwit: 160 molting adults on 12th at North Point and 290 on 11th at
ittle Piskwamish, where a Hudsonian Godwit with red flag CMC from Chile was
een and photographed on 31 July.
Marbled Godwit, 1 adult male with 2 juveniles on 11, 12 and 13th at North Point,
lus an additional juvenile on 11th.
Ruddy Turnstone: 49 adults on 13th at North Point and 58 on 11th at Little
iskwamish. Longridge recorded a Ruddy Turnstone with a lime green flag from
elaware Bay, USA, on 10th.
RED KNOT: Of the three surveys sites for this period Little Piskwamish had the
ighest one day count of 2400 on 11th, Longridge had 250 on 12th, and North
oint only 5 on 13th. FLAGS: The combined three sites for the entire survey
allied about 2000 individual sightings of flags representing more than 600
ifferently marked birds from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, United States and
anada. Celebrity knot TY was last seen at Longridge on 11 August. A knot with a
hite flag placed in Quebec was seen many times during the final two week
eriod.  DATALOGGERS: Longridge recorded 2 dataloggers and Little Piskwamish had
, all put on in the United States. JUVENILES: The juvenile knot migration was
ust starting when we left. Little Piskwamish,  7 juveniles on 11th. North
oint, 2 juveniles on 11th. Longridge, several juveniles on 12th. It would be
nteresting to know how many juveniles stage on the James Bay and how long they
tay. We hope to survey longer next year.
Sanderling: 26 molting adults on 11th at North Point, 8 on 13th at Little
iskwamish. Longridge recorded a lime green flag from Delaware Bay, USA.
Semipalmated Sandpiper: 5100 on 11th at North Point were still almost all
dults. Increased numbers of juveniles arrived on the afternoon of 13th. A bird
ith flag lime OHU from the USA was at North Point on 13th. Longridge recorded a
ellow flag from Suriname on 28 July and 7 August.
Least Sandpiper: 308 on 12th at North Point were almost all juveniles. 277 on
1th at Little Piskwamish were all juveniles.
White-rumped Sandpiper: 31,657 on 11th at Little Piskwamish. 9800 molting adults
n 11th at North Point. This is the commonest shorebird in southern James Bay.
Pectoral Sandpiper: 436 non-molting adults on 12th at North Point. 295 on 11th
t Little Piskwamish.
Dunlin: 209 adults on 11th at North Point were starting to show signs of molt.
95 on 11th at Little Piskwamish.
Short-billed Dowitcher: 27 on 11th at Little Piskwamish, those seen well were
uveniles.
Wilson's Snipe: 13 on 12th at Little Piskwamish.
Wilson's Phalarope: 1 juvenile on 11th at Little Piskwamish.
Red-necked Phalarope: 1 adult on 11th at Little Piskwamish.
SHOREBIRD MIGRATION: A huge southbound migration took place on 11th and 13th
uring the day, taking advantage of strong north winds. Birds were high and very
ocal. Flock size varied from 6 to 70 and included Black-bellied Plovers,
reater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Whimbrel, Hudsonian Godwits, Pectoral Sandpipers,
hite-rumped Sandpipers, Dunlin and Ruddy Turnstones.
OTHER BIRDS: In rough checklist order: Canada Goose, 476 on 11th at North Point
nd 853 at Little Piskwamish. 3 Northern Harriers at North Point included 2
uveniles on 12th and 13th, which were catching Savannah Sparrows. Small mammals
umbers were extremely low on the wide coastal prairie-like expanses. Sandhill
rane, 38 on 12th at North Point and 30 on 11th at Little Piskwamish. Little
ull, 1 juvenile on 12th at Little Piskwamish. Bonaparte's Gull, 466 on 11th at
ittle Piskwamish and 8 on 13th at North Point. Common Tern, 33 on 13th at North
oint included many family groups with adults feeding noisy juveniles. Arctic
ern, a family group of 4 on 13th at Little Piskwamish. Long-eared Owl, 1 on
3th at Longridge was seen and heard. BELTED KINGFISHER: 1 on 11th at Longridge
as new for our survey camps checklist. Northern Shrike, 1 on 12th at Little
iskwamish. Olive-sided Flycatcher, 2 on 13th and 14th at North Point. Common
avens, 8 on 12th at North Point; one caught !
a sandpiper on 13th. Boreal Chickadee, 1 daily at Little Piskwamish. Gray Jay,
air with a dark juvenile regular at North Point and Little Piskwamish camps,
uveniles are molting now. Swallow migration at Little Piskwamish: Tree Swallow,
3 on 12th, Bank Swallow, 2 on 12th. Swainson's Thrush, 2 still at North Point
amp on 13th. American Pipit, 1 on 12th and 13th with damaged right eye at North
oint. WARBLERS at North Point in pre-migration flocks included Tennessee,
range-crowned, Cape May, Yellow-rumped, Bay-breasted, Blackpoll, Palm,
lack-and-white, American Redstart, Wilson's and Canada. Little Piskwamish had a
allout of warblers on 12th. Sparrows: Le Conte's Sparrow, 4 on 11th and 12th at
ittle Piskwamish. Nelson's Sparrow, 11 on 11th at Little Piskwamish, Swamp
parrow, 33 on 12th at Little Piskwamish. Savannah Sparrow, 130 on 11th at
ittle Piskwamish and 59 on 11th at North Point. Clay-colored Sparrow, 2 on 12th
t North Point. Rusty Blackbird, 8 on 11th at Lit!
tle Piskwamish. Common Grackle, 1 on 13th at Little Piskwamish. Purple
Finch, at least 1 daily at Little Piskwamish and one on 12th and 13th at North
oint. White-winged Crossbills fed on ripening spruce cones at North Point and
ere seen and heard regularly at Little Piskwamish.
MAMMALS: Male Moose with large antlers seen from helicopter near Longridge on
4th. Gray Wolf tracks on 11th at North Point. Black Bear seen most days at
ongridge. Unidentified bat on 11th and 14th at Longridge. Heather Vole, 1 on
2th at Little Piskwamish.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: I especially thank Ron Pittaway for posting my reports from
ames Bay. Ron inspired my love of shorebirds and encouraged me to volunteer for
orthern surveys with the OMNR and ROM.
PHOTOS of this summer's survey.
ww.jeaniron.ca/2011/JamesBay2011/index.htm
Jean Iron
oronto, Ontario
anada


From janmehmel at gmail.com  Tue Aug 23 17:06:35 2011
From: janmehmel at gmail.com (Janet Mehmel)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 17:06:35 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER
Message-ID: <CAOvLLxKvXNOkDLeqz3ux+wcY0F-P+3B9LixOByzomsX1ZdFmYA@mail.gmail.com>

8/23/11 - - Branford, Quarry Road off Rt 146  OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER on the
east side of the road.  Also saw American Redstarts, Canada Warbler, Black
and White Warbler, Baltimore Oriole, lots of Tree Swallows.
Quarry Rd has a fresh water swamp on both sides with water right up to the
road.  I was there looking for butterflies because there are many alders and
button bush along the road.

janet mehmel
guilford

From alexanderburdo at mac.com  Tue Aug 23 20:25:24 2011
From: alexanderburdo at mac.com (Alexander Burdo)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 20:25:24 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] 8/23 - Fairfield Migrants
Message-ID: <554C52F3-2D1D-412B-AAA5-7191D531B278@mac.com>

I was able to sneak in some birding in the evening after being busy with school stuff most of the day. Both the Birdcraft Sanctuary and South Pine Creek were much more productive in terms of migrants than I had expected with eight species of warbler being seen. It was a great day except for the fact that my bike was stolen, which was my main way of getting to birding spots.

Highlights below:

Birdcraft Sanctuary: 3-4pm

1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
5 Black-and-white Warbler
11 American Redstart
1 Northern Waterthrush
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Wilson's Warbler

South Pine Creek OS: 5-6pm
1-2 Magnolia Warbler
8 Black-and-white Warbler
9 American Redstart
2 Common Yellowthroat
2 Canada Warbler
plus....
12 Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 "Traill's" Flycatcher
1 Warbling Vireo
4 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1 Eastern Bluebird -- flyover; my first for this location, very uncommon south of I-95 in Fairfield

Alex Burdo
Fairfield





From Mntncougar at aol.com  Tue Aug 23 21:50:03 2011
From: Mntncougar at aol.com (Mntncougar at aol.com)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 21:50:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Barred owl, Black Vulture, Canaan Mtn, N. Canaan
Message-ID: <173d60.50cc167b.3b85b2cb@aol.com>

Spotted a Barred Owl who had already spotted me on Canaan Mtn,  N. Canaan,
today. When I tried to get a little closer I momentarily passed  behind a
tree, and when I came out the other side, he was gone, like a ghost.  Tree was
about 10 inches diameter, and all I heard was the slightest whisper of  air.
Also, one Black Vulture riding the updrafts from the very light  NW wind.

Pics of the BAOW here, sorry for the dupes.

http://www.photoshop.com/users/mntncougar/albums/d4a6d84e0aaf4ba09ca2d2310b3
eaa2e/slideshow

Don Morgan
Coventry

From robben99 at gmail.com  Wed Aug 24 00:47:46 2011
From: robben99 at gmail.com (Thomas Robben)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 00:47:46 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Hurricane Irene appears to aiming at us
Message-ID: <CANpJbq2cTe0obwC2+f20xJ1kEHHu9Mo-TpsFdHdYfopNXeJ5wA@mail.gmail.com>


Hi Sarah,
As Nick said, its definitely too early to be sure of anything, but as of the
moment hurricane Irene SEEMS to be pointed toward a glancing hit on
NorthCarolina 8pm Saturday and a second landfall around New York City 8pm
Sunday evening, as per this map from NOAA National Hurricane Center.....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:09L_2011_5day.gif
As my friend P.A.Buckley has noted, some of the best birds may be found
under or east of the eye of the storm.
Monday August 29th might be a good day to schedule as a "vacation day" if
possible.  From a birding point of view, Irene's currently estimated track
is extremely exciting, and all the East Coast bird lists will probably start
buzzing about this hurricane in the next few days.
Tom


Tom Robben
Glastonbury CT

=======================
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Pelagic & Unusual Birds question
From: Nick Bonomo <nbonomo AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 11:57:34 -0400
Hi Sarah,

This all depends on storm track. With so much time between now and
then, so many things can change, and the track is far from certain. As
we get closer to the weekend, I'm sure several of us will be
speculating on potential birds and where to go to look for them.

Generally speaking though, you want a point of land that sticks into
LI Sound such as (east to west) Stonington Pt, Enders Island,
Cornfield Pt, Meigs Pt, Stratford Pt, Shippan Pt, etc etc.

Nick

Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com


On Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 11:52 AM, Sarah Faulkner
wrote:

> I've been watching the weather forecast, and it seems that Hurricane
Irene
may pay us a visit here this weekend.

>
> If I were to spend a half-day birding somewhere along the shore in CT or
RI
?(not enough time to get to the Cape), what would be the BEST place(s) to
look
for pelagics/interesting species that might be blown in?

>
> Sarah Faulkner
> Collinsville, CT

From jtrouern at gmail.com  Wed Aug 24 06:46:30 2011
From: jtrouern at gmail.com (Jonathan Trouern-Trend)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 06:46:30 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Rocky Hill Meadows
Message-ID: <CANWtARj3WirQw2WLBErY-P0RARsbBJNgHbSwS+keHhLs7rh8qA@mail.gmail.com>

Still a good collection of shorebirds at the large puddle at the
intersection of Great Meadow Road and North Meadow Lane in the Rocky Hill
Meadows. I visited twice yesterday (8 AM and 5:30PM).

8/23/2011 - 8am
Killdeer - 15
Semipalmated Plover - 8
Lesser Yellowlegs - 2
Solitary Sandpiper - 1
Least Sandpiper - 10
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3

8/23/2011 - 5:30pm
Killdeer - 45
Least Sandpiper - 30
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 10

Jonathan Trouern-Trend

From teustis at killingworthlibrary.org  Wed Aug 24 07:16:20 2011
From: teustis at killingworthlibrary.org (Tammy Eustis)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 11:16:20 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Chester, 8/23 - owls, hawks, etc.
Message-ID: <W84442169883231314184580@webmail15>

Chester, 8/23 - one GREAT-HORNED OWL, three RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS, three ORIOLES, one BARRED OWL. A lucrative day, morning to night!
~ Tammy Eustis, Chester





From flybird at optonline.net  Wed Aug 24 08:31:19 2011
From: flybird at optonline.net (Stacy Hanks)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 08:31:19 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] American Bittern
Message-ID: <F33FCCAACC954E2997CA490673D6E28A@racPC>

>From Stacy Hanks:
8/24 - Milford, Beachland Ave - AMERICAN BITTERN on power lines. Found this most unusual.
Looked like something was spooking birds out of the marsh. Snowy Egret was flying around and also trying to land on power line. It was why I saw the Bittern.

From bpropen at gmail.com  Wed Aug 24 13:49:03 2011
From: bpropen at gmail.com (Beverly Propen)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 13:49:03 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] CACC
Message-ID: <CAMcNza=QHsBvhbVvca2Nwt=ius3xtfi8gcSbSgfCVvyopko+mQ@mail.gmail.com>

8/24  Milford, Connecticut Audubon Coastal Center
10AM-1PM  mid tide, receding, sunny/partly cloudy  75 degrees
2 juvenile ospreys were on the nest & camera all morning.  They took a brief
flight, but basically stayed on the nest area.  One was eating a fish;both
were calling all morning.
1 spotted sandpiper in the grasses by the marsh mud as tide was receding.
about 100 semipalmated plovers, and about 50 semipalmated sandpipers,
D.C. cormorants, mute swans, common terns, 1 juvenile N. harrier soaring
around the marsh, snowy egrets, Great egrets, 1 Laughing gull.
2 Peregrines doing some acrobatic flying over the marsh, catbird, mourning
doves, goldfinches, tree swallows,  many Red winged blackbird juveniles,
house sparrows, song sparrows, catbird, mockingbird, cardinal, cowbirds and
16 American black ducks.  No purple martins at the martin condo.
Bev Propen, Orange

From dlawton at sbcglobal.net  Wed Aug 24 14:56:32 2011
From: dlawton at sbcglobal.net (D Lawton)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 11:56:32 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Hunting in Bushnell Park
Message-ID: <1314212192.8510.YahooMailRC@web80506.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

An unanticipated delight:  At the little pond in Bushnell Park in downtown
Hartford, I just witnessed an Osprey descend, circle, hover then dive and
successfully grab lunch out of the pond between the two fountains... while two
Peregrines wheeled far above the Travelers Tower.

David
www.DailyBirder.com

From kmueller at ntplx.net  Wed Aug 24 15:24:43 2011
From: kmueller at ntplx.net (kmueller at ntplx.net)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 15:24:43 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Saturdays R. I. Block Canyon Pelagic report,
 results and images    Keith Mueller
Message-ID: <20110824152443.23631wh8rar8m3nf@webmail.netplex.net>

My friend Tom Robben just put the finishing touches on saturday's
Rhode Island Block Canyon Pelagic trip report and results on our blog
Coastal Birds: http://coastalbirds2.blogspot.com/

Part 2 of this report is included as an Addendum and is viewed at the
bottom of Block Canyon Pelagic after the species highlights.

It was great to see eveyone on the trip.

Enjoy the report!

Keith Mueller
Tom Robben






From mantlik at sbcglobal.net  Wed Aug 24 16:15:53 2011
From: mantlik at sbcglobal.net (Frank Mantlik)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 13:15:53 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Stratford Black Tern & Skimmers
Message-ID: <1314216953.89827.YahooMailRC@web80003.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>

>From Frank Mantlik

8/24  Stratford, Dorne Drive, Short Beach Park, 2:15 - 3:30pm - At the mouth of
the Housatonic River, large flocks of foaraging and resting terns included: 1500
Common Terns, 1 BLACK TERN (saw it fly by once towards Stratford Point; perhaps
didn't stay to feed), 5 BLACK SKIMMERS (1 adult & 4 juveniles present the whole
time).  Note:  non-residents are still charged an auto parking fee.

8/23 Stratford, Short Beach Park - 2500 Common Terns, resting and fishing at the
river mouth.

From mswanhall at earthlink.net  Wed Aug 24 18:58:40 2011
From: mswanhall at earthlink.net (martin swanhall)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 18:58:40 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Subject: [CT Birds] Hurricane Irene
Message-ID: <23439207.1314226720653.JavaMail.root@mswamui-swiss.atl.sa.earthlink.net>


>From Peter Trull of MASSBIRDS...


"massbirders,
If Hurricane Irene hits the Cape Cod with the suggested high force winds, it 
could be devastating to migratory bird populations, especially roseate and 
common terns.  South Beach and Monomoy Is, Chatham and Sandy Neck Barnstable 
are major staging and roosting areas for both species.  Roseate Terns in 
eastern North America, including Falkners Is. and Gt. Gull Is., in CT and NY 
respectively, have also been major areas for these birds to stage during 
post breeding dispersal.  Both are in the path of Irene......
Hurricanes bring exciting observations for us birders, but they have their 
downside related to high avian mortality.
Peter Trull
Brewster, MA
petrull at comcast.net
www.wildcapecod.com" 




From lk06 at yahoo.com  Wed Aug 24 22:22:56 2011
From: lk06 at yahoo.com (lk06)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 19:22:56 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Nighthawks at New Haven Open Tennis, 8/24
Message-ID: <1314238976.83701.YahooMailClassic@web111413.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>

4-5 nighthawks flying above the lights during the Maria Kirilenko v Na Li
match from 8:20 - 9:00 pm at the New Haven Open Tennis Stadium.

--Lane


From pwolter6 at earthlink.net  Wed Aug 24 22:24:36 2011
From: pwolter6 at earthlink.net (paul wolter)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 22:24:36 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Subject: [CT Birds] Hartford County Birding
Message-ID: <15200635.1314239076812.JavaMail.root@elwamui-royal.atl.sa.earthlink.net>


from Paul Desjardins and Paul Wolter

8/24/11 Windsor, NorthWest Park. Common Raven 2, Least Sandpiper 2, Merlin 1, Chestnut Sided Warbler 1, Scarlet Tanager 1.
8/24/11 Suffield, Lewis Farm. Black Throated Green Warbler 1, Canada Warbler 1, American Redstart 1.
8/24/11 East Granby, Greenstone Hollow. Ruby Throated Hummingbird 2, American Redstart 4, Red Eyed Vireo 2.
8/24/11 Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows. Greater Yellowlegs 5, Least Sandpiper 25, Semi Palmated Sandpiper 1.


From timant123 at yahoo.com  Wed Aug 24 23:22:54 2011
From: timant123 at yahoo.com (Tim Antanaitis)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 20:22:54 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Griswold Point Stilt Sandpiper
Message-ID: <1314242574.10811.YahooMailNeo@web125706.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>

8/24 - Old Lyme, Griswold Point -- 1 STILT SANDPIPER, 3 FORSTER'S TERNS

Kayaked from Smith Neck Road boat launch.? Low tide was 1:00.? Saw the Stilt around 2:00 just east of the western most Osprey platform (only platform on GP?) on Griswold Point.

Also 9 other common shorebird species (about 100 total shorebirds):
3 Short-billed Dowitcher
9 Greater Yellowlegs
2 Lesser Yellowlegs
3 Ruddy Turnstone
5 Willet
7 Least Sandpiper
20 Semipalmated Sandpiper
30 Black-bellied Plover
25 Semipalmated Plover

45 Common Tern
1 Least Tern


Tim Antanaitis
Middletown

From j.mcbride at yale.edu  Wed Aug 24 23:35:16 2011
From: j.mcbride at yale.edu (Florence McBride)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 23:35:16 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Common NIghthawks at the New Haven Open
In-Reply-To: <mailman.71.1314201621.13769.ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org@lists.ctbirding.o
rg>
References: <mailman.71.1314201621.13769.ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org@lists.ctbirding.o
rg>
Message-ID: <p0623092fca7b6669abe1@[10.0.1.3]>

8/24/11 New Haven over the Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale,
8:15-9:30 pm  COMMON NIGHTHAWKS.  The most seen at any one time was
five or six.  While watching the match, I kept a running total of
birds sighted after dark; when we left at about 9:30 it was up to 58
(single birds, 2 or 3 at once, and one sighting of 5 or 6) -- but of
course there was no way of knowing how many individuals there were.
One also seen before dark.


From cimbaro at att.net  Thu Aug 25 01:50:38 2011
From: cimbaro at att.net (cimbaro at att.net)
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 22:50:38 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper at Cabela's - East Hartford
Message-ID: <1314251438.23297.YahooMailClassic@web180301.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>

Baird's Sandpiper late this evening 8/24 at the pond behind Cabela's.  Also
the following:
Killdeer
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Semipalmated Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 3

Dan Cimbaro
Colchester


From carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net  Thu Aug 25 12:58:28 2011
From: carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net (Carrier Graphics)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 09:58:28 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] In regards to hurricanes and sea birds.
Message-ID: <1314291508.81051.YahooMailRC@web81804.mail.mud.yahoo.com>


In regards to hurricanes and sea birds. 


Many years ago, we sat under a motels' 2nd floor walkway after vacating our 
campsite in Wellfleet Cape Cod and watched a hurricane pass through there verses 
evacuating. The winds built, and we observed the following....


While we observed several large trees and branches blow down, the most 
interesting sightings were the birds. Most birds seemed to get through the high 
winds by flying in them. Mostly gulls and terns, though some Swallows were seen 
as well. They all did very well using this tactic. And when the winds were 
extremely strong, many gulls and terns were observed flapping into the head wind 
while progressing backwards! It did not seem to matter, for they were safer in 
the air vs being on the ground for sure. 




After the storm's extremely high winds and rain passed through, we quickly 
visited the shore cliffs at Trurro. here the winds were still strong, though the 
rains had passed. Many gulls and terns had landed on the beach below the cliff 
getting out of the high west winds blowing from land, creating enormous white 
caped waves off shore.


 Of interest were the many land birds who it seemed were blown out to sea from 
the hurricane, and were now attempting to reach land once again. Many were 
Swallows but I remember seeing with bins, some warbler type birds and Sparrows 
trying to reach land, but not getting much help from the strong off land winds. 
To me it seemed, land birds were the ones getting the worst of it vs the sea 
birds, who flew stronger into the high winds while land birds did not. After 
spending an hour there, we saw not one land bird reach land, while sea birds 
were enjoying the rest below, or flying along the beach as they usually do.


Paul Carrier et al       

From djc225lbt at att.net  Thu Aug 25 13:05:44 2011
From: djc225lbt at att.net (David Coutu)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:05:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper at Cabela's - East Hartford
In-Reply-To: <1314251438.23297.YahooMailClassic@web180301.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
References: <1314251438.23297.YahooMailClassic@web180301.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
Message-ID: <1314291944.14628.YahooMailRC@web83705.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>

Baird's Sandpiper continues behind Cabellas.?? 11:00AM?? Allowed close
approach.?? David Coutu




________________________________
From: "cimbaro at att.net" <cimbaro at att.net>
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Sent: Thu, August 25, 2011 1:50:38 AM
Subject: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper at Cabela's - East Hartford

Baird's Sandpiper late this evening 8/24 at the pond behind Cabela's.? Also
the following:
Killdeer
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Semipalmated Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 3

Dan Cimbaro
Colchester

_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for
the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit
http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org

From pcianfaglione at hotmail.com  Thu Aug 25 14:19:30 2011
From: pcianfaglione at hotmail.com (paul cianfaglione)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 18:19:30 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Pond
Message-ID: <BLU135-W21C6376E913E7799EB11B1BB100@phx.gbl>


8/25 East Hartford, Cabela's Pond  -  1 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER...... plus 1 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER that has an injured right wing.

Paul Cianfaglione
Canton
http://capitalcitybirding.blogspot.com/  

From chbarnjr at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 15:32:17 2011
From: chbarnjr at gmail.com (charles barnard jr)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 15:32:17 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Milford Point this morning
Message-ID: <CAEhpbrVtraSKYW+aTdjq=TQ1M0gLbZducqo4k1FYgHqWjQy0CA@mail.gmail.com>

This morning between 8:30 and 10:30, at the high tide, I birded Milford
Point (the LIS side) mostly with Nick Bonomo, but also Dennis Varza and
Charles Hills for a little while.   Here are my numbers of the more uncommon
species, which may vary from those of Nick and others.: Black Tern (3),
Forster's Tern (3), Black Skimmer (4),  Red Knot (8), Stilt Sandpiper (1).

 More common species included about  450 Common Terns, 1 Least Tern, 35
Short-billed Dowitcher, Black-bellied Plover (110),  Semipalmated Plover
(150), Sanderling (80), Semipalmated Sandpiper (400), Ruddy Turnstone (2),
American Oystercatcher (2) and Lesser Yellowlegs (1) There were also 2
Peregrine Falcons present.

 Nick was still birding when I left, so maybe he will expand this list
later.

From mardi1d at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 15:41:56 2011
From: mardi1d at gmail.com (Mardi Dickinson)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 15:41:56 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Jamaica Bay Shorebird Festival - CANCELLED
Message-ID: <09AB2CED-54C7-405F-AB24-CA1297574AD0@gmail.com>


Birders et al,

I wanted to pass this note along from Lloyd Spitalnik who sent this to the NYList. For those who may have been
going from CT.

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson
Email: mardi1d at gmail.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/MardiWD
Blog: http://kymry.wordpress.com/


Hi Everyone,
Because of extremely high water levels at Jamaica Bay and more rain coming we?ve decided to cancel the festival
his Saturday the 27th. We all feel bad about it but we always want to give you the best experience. This year there
were just too m any bstacles including 8? of rain in a 24 hour period and an impending hurricane on the way. Sorry
if this ruins anybody?s plans. It was a difficult decision by all the organizers. See you there next year.
Batten down the hatches and stay safe during the coming storm.

All our best,
Don Riepe
Kevin Karlson
NPS
NYC Audubon
Lloyd
Lloyd Spitalnik Photography
www.lloydspitalnikphotos.com




















From paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 16:02:14 2011
From: paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com (Paul Desjardins)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 16:02:14 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Small patches of habitat
Message-ID: <96C0BCD7-A45B-473B-9254-A225E6FA2F2B@gmail.com>

Yesterday while  Paul Wolter and i were in the parking lot of Northwest Park in Windsor we found 2 Least sandpipers
near a very small puddle of water. We thought how interesting that they discovered such a small amount of water.
i know that shorebirds are known to migrate at high altitudes so if they saw this water from high up and just dropped
down this is truly amazing how they spotted it!

From robben99 at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 16:02:02 2011
From: robben99 at gmail.com (Thomas Robben)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 16:02:02 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Hurricane Irene bird-reports aggregated
Message-ID: <CANpJbq0ktMW-ZHQVeAwmw_aJ_2Tk6xcvobN8pQGw2-Z_ttBmzQ@mail.gmail.com>


Encouraged by a few friends, we are starting a temporary web site for just
one week, to track the increasingly DANGEROUS hurricane Irene and all the
related bird reports, from Florida up to maritime Canada. Not sure how
useful this will be, but we will give it a try. Hopefully we will have lots
of "hurricane birds" and this site will provide one convenient centralized
picture of all those hurricane-bird-reports along this thousand miles of
coastline, and nearby. If there aren't any hurricane birds, there wont be
much to report. We will get our data by manually checking every one of the
twenty bird listserv sites along the East Coast, every day for one week, and
add relevant references and links into our one site...
 http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/


More importantly, hopefully Irene will not hurt anyone. Be careful, this is
starting to look like a very dangerous storm, with forecast of a possible
deadly storm surge hitting the East Coast, including New England....
http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=1899


Tom Robben
Glastonbury CT

From mhmoorep at aol.com  Thu Aug 25 17:16:54 2011
From: mhmoorep at aol.com (mhmoorep at aol.com)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:16:54 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] mini-habitats
Message-ID: <8CE31837277A367-A6C-18125@webmail-d054.sysops.aol.com>


I suspect many of have shared Paul's amazement at what can show up in mini-habitats. I was at the Wallingford Super Stop & Shop a few years ago after a heavy morning shower, and the busy parking lot held 70 or 80 peeps exploring the puddles.



Marty Moore
Wallingford

From lpflynn at optonline.net  Thu Aug 25 17:30:15 2011
From: lpflynn at optonline.net (lpflynn at optonline.net)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:30:15 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Cockenoe Island Westport
Message-ID: <e55ab358b94f.4e56bee7@optonline.net>

For the past three years I have followed AMERICAN
OYSTERCATCHERS staging this time of year on the Norwalk Islands, in all of those years Crow Island was the place for this gathering, with numbers as high a 63. Today there was only 1.
This year the birds are not assembling on Crow Island but rather on
Cockenoe Island, Tina Green has been spotting this group from the mainland shore for about a week. I checked each island today by boat to confirm that they in fact did move.
Also on
Cockenoe Island were 3 juv BLACK SKIMMERS, 1 FORSTER'S TERN along with 120 COMMON TERNS, mostly young still being fed by adults.
Larry Flynn
Norwalk Islands, Fairfield, US-CT
Aug 25, 2011 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     52
amoy were on cockenoe
16 species

Double-crested Cormorant  100
Great Egret  5
Snowy Egret  2
Black-crowned Night-Heron  1
Osprey  7
Black-bellied Plover  6
Semipalmated Plover  25
American Oystercatcher  53     52 staging on cockenoe island, 1 on crow island
Ruddy Turnstone  30
Laughing Gull  40
Herring Gull  60
Great Black-backed Gull  40
Least Tern  1
Common Tern  120
Forster's Tern  1
Black Skimmer  3

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2 (http://ebird.org)

From streatham2003 at aol.com  Thu Aug 25 17:38:45 2011
From: streatham2003 at aol.com (streatham2003 at aol.com)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:38:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Sunrise Birding weekend walk moved to Saturday
Message-ID: <8CE31868066E121-22F8-7EF5D@webmail-m028.sysops.aol.com>


 Hi All,

I just wanted to let people know that the Sunrise Birding walk for this Sunday has been moved to the Saturday. Last time a couple of people just showed up without booking, so although unlikely that anyone might try to do so this on this particular Sunday I thought I best just send out a warning in case. I guess if I were really hardcore I'd keep the walk on the Sunday - could be interesting ;)

Just a quick view on the hurricane. Although at this current time safety rather than birds is a priority, I thought it worth mentioning that even if you don't live near the coast this kind of weather can still bring interesting birds. During one of the more recent tropical storms (which actually turned into something of a damp squib) I was rather thrilled to discover a couple of Semi-P Plovers at Allen's Meadows in Wilton for the patch list. Inland reservoirs and open spaces like ballfields can certainly turn up something relatively exciting. I'm sure people will post more on possibilities anon. Personally I'll be keeping my eyes open for something interesting over the hawkwatch on the Monday and hoping we keep power and don't lose too many trees.

Luke Tiller, Greenwich
www.underclearskies.com
www.sunrisebirding.com









From mswanhall at earthlink.net  Thu Aug 25 17:51:40 2011
From: mswanhall at earthlink.net (Marty Swanhall)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:51:40 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Solitary Sandpiper
Message-ID: <7AAF46956DAE41A29A619A1EA4C2C5D2@SwanhallPC>

Saw a  solitary Sandpiper and Great Blue Heron in wetlands on South Pomperaug Road in Woodbury on my way home from work today.

Marty in Woodbury

From givenrandy at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 19:47:17 2011
From: givenrandy at gmail.com (Randy Given)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 19:47:17 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Peregrine Falcons at Riverside Park ?
Message-ID: <CABzQ++UUwR7pZM04D-xEVh11nUgSv8Gf2CnWHZp0BQY1kWPLNg@mail.gmail.com>

I've seen several postings about Peregrine Falcons at Riverside Park,
but I haven't seen any myself. Granted, they're not that common. Were
they seen there or were they seen flying over Hartford from there?

Randy Given


From louise40pt at yahoo.com  Thu Aug 25 20:21:44 2011
From: louise40pt at yahoo.com (louise tucker)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:21:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Peregrine Falcon on 190 bridge - Enfield
Message-ID: <1314318104.66814.YahooMailClassic@web161315.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>

>From Louise P. Tucker:
August 25, 2011 - Enfield-Suffield -? A young Peregrine Falcon was sitting on a lamp post on the 190 Bridge connecting Enfield and Suffield. Approx. 7:00 pm onwards.

From ktjensen at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 20:30:16 2011
From: ktjensen at gmail.com (Kevin Jensen)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 20:30:16 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] (no subject)
In-Reply-To: <mailman.6642.1314316040.14234.ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org@lists.ctbirding.org>
References: <mailman.6642.1314316040.14234.ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org@lists.ctbirding.org>
Message-ID: <134453D0-2165-4059-AE9E-351AB1660AE5@gmail.com>

Luna barn owl. Lost?  Has anyone read the

Sent from my Verizon iPhone 4

On Aug 25, 2011, at 7:47 PM, ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org wrote:

> Send CTBirds mailing list submissions to
>    ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>    http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>    ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
>    ctbirds-owner at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of CTBirds digest..."
>
>
> ***  When replying to this message please trim off the unrelated portions ***
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. In regards to hurricanes and sea birds. (Carrier Graphics)
>   2. Re: Baird's Sandpiper at Cabela's - East Hartford (David Coutu)
>   3. Cabela's Pond (paul cianfaglione)
>   4. Milford Point this morning (charles barnard jr)
>   5. Jamaica Bay Shorebird Festival - CANCELLED (Mardi Dickinson)
>   6. Small patches of habitat (Paul Desjardins)
>   7. Hurricane Irene bird-reports aggregated (Thomas Robben)
>   8. mini-habitats (mhmoorep at aol.com)
>   9. Cockenoe Island Westport (lpflynn at optonline.net)
>  10. Sunrise Birding weekend walk moved to Saturday
>      (streatham2003 at aol.com)
>  11. Solitary Sandpiper (Marty Swanhall)
>  12. Peregrine Falcons at Riverside Park ? (Randy Given)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 09:58:28 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Carrier Graphics <carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] In regards to hurricanes and sea birds.
> Message-ID: <1314291508.81051.YahooMailRC at web81804.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> In regards to hurricanes and sea birds.
>
> Many years ago, we sat under a motels' 2nd floor walkway after vacating our
> campsite in Wellfleet Cape Cod and watched a hurricane pass through there verses
> evacuating. The winds built, and we observed the following....
>
> While we observed several large trees and branches blow down, the most
> interesting sightings were the birds. Most birds seemed to get through the high
> winds by flying in them. Mostly gulls and terns, though some Swallows were seen
> as well. They all did very well using this tactic. And when the winds were
> extremely strong, many gulls and terns were observed flapping into the head wind
> while progressing backwards! It did not seem to matter, for they were safer in
> the air vs being on the ground for sure.
>
>
> After the storm's extremely high winds and rain passed through, we quickly
> visited the shore cliffs at Trurro. here the winds were still strong, though the
> rains had passed. Many gulls and terns had landed on the beach below the cliff
> getting out of the high west winds blowing from land, creating enormous white
> caped waves off shore.
>
> Of interest were the many land birds who it seemed were blown out to sea from
> the hurricane, and were now attempting to reach land once again. Many were
> Swallows but I remember seeing with bins, some warbler type birds and Sparrows
> trying to reach land, but not getting much help from the strong off land winds.
> To me it seemed, land birds were the ones getting the worst of it vs the sea
> birds, who flew stronger into the high winds while land birds did not. After
> spending an hour there, we saw not one land bird reach land, while sea birds
> were enjoying the rest below, or flying along the beach as they usually do.
>
> Paul Carrier et al    
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:05:44 -0700 (PDT)
> From: David Coutu <djc225lbt at att.net>
> To: cimbaro at att.net, ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper at Cabela's - East Hartford
> Message-ID: <1314291944.14628.YahooMailRC at web83705.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Baird's Sandpiper continues behind Cabellas.?? 11:00AM?? Allowed close
> approach.?? David Coutu
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: "cimbaro at att.net" <cimbaro at att.net>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Sent: Thu, August 25, 2011 1:50:38 AM
> Subject: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper at Cabela's - East Hartford
>
> Baird's Sandpiper late this evening 8/24 at the pond behind Cabela's.? Also
> the following:
> Killdeer
> Lesser Yellowlegs 2
> Spotted Sandpiper 1
> Semipalmated Sandpiper 1
> Least Sandpiper 3
>
> Dan Cimbaro
> Colchester
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for
> the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 18:19:30 +0000
> From: paul cianfaglione <pcianfaglione at hotmail.com>
> To: Ctbirds Ctbirdslists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Pond
> Message-ID: <BLU135-W21C6376E913E7799EB11B1BB100 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>
> 8/25 East Hartford, Cabela's Pond  -  1 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER...... plus 1 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER that has an injured right wing.
>
> Paul Cianfaglione
> Canton
> http://capitalcitybirding.blogspot.com/                        
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 15:32:17 -0400
> From: charles barnard jr <chbarnjr at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Milford Point this morning
> Message-ID:
>    <CAEhpbrVtraSKYW+aTdjq=TQ1M0gLbZducqo4k1FYgHqWjQy0CA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> This morning between 8:30 and 10:30, at the high tide, I birded Milford
> Point (the LIS side) mostly with Nick Bonomo, but also Dennis Varza and
> Charles Hills for a little while.   Here are my numbers of the more uncommon
> species, which may vary from those of Nick and others.: Black Tern (3),
> Forster's Tern (3), Black Skimmer (4),  Red Knot (8), Stilt Sandpiper (1).
>
> More common species included about  450 Common Terns, 1 Least Tern, 35
> Short-billed Dowitcher, Black-bellied Plover (110),  Semipalmated Plover
> (150), Sanderling (80), Semipalmated Sandpiper (400), Ruddy Turnstone (2),
> American Oystercatcher (2) and Lesser Yellowlegs (1) There were also 2
> Peregrine Falcons present.
>
> Nick was still birding when I left, so maybe he will expand this list
> later.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 15:41:56 -0400
> From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d at gmail.com>
> To: CT Birds  Birds List <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Jamaica Bay Shorebird Festival - CANCELLED
> Message-ID: <09AB2CED-54C7-405F-AB24-CA1297574AD0 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=windows-1252
>
>
> Birders et al,
>
> I wanted to pass this note along from Lloyd Spitalnik who sent this to the NYList. For those who may have been
> going from CT.
>
> Cheers,
> Mardi Dickinson
> Email: mardi1d at gmail.com
> Twitter: http://twitter.com/MardiWD
> Blog: http://kymry.wordpress.com/
>
>
> Hi Everyone,
> Because of extremely high water levels at Jamaica Bay and more rain coming we?ve decided to cancel the festival
> his Saturday the 27th. We all feel bad about it but we always want to give you the best experience. This year there
> were just too m any bstacles including 8? of rain in a 24 hour period and an impending hurricane on the way. Sorry
> if this ruins anybody?s plans. It was a difficult decision by all the organizers. See you there next year.
> Batten down the hatches and stay safe during the coming storm.
>
> All our best,
> Don Riepe
> Kevin Karlson
> NPS
> NYC Audubon
> Lloyd
> Lloyd Spitalnik Photography
> www.lloydspitalnikphotos.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 16:02:14 -0400
> From: Paul Desjardins <paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Small patches of habitat
> Message-ID: <96C0BCD7-A45B-473B-9254-A225E6FA2F2B at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Yesterday while  Paul Wolter and i were in the parking lot of Northwest Park in Windsor we found 2 Least sandpipers
> near a very small puddle of water. We thought how interesting that they discovered such a small amount of water.
> i know that shorebirds are known to migrate at high altitudes so if they saw this water from high up and just dropped
> down this is truly amazing how they spotted it!
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 16:02:02 -0400
> From: Thomas Robben <robben99 at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Cc: "P.A. BUCKLEY" <pab387 at cox.net>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Hurricane Irene bird-reports aggregated
> Message-ID:
>    <CANpJbq0ktMW-ZHQVeAwmw_aJ_2Tk6xcvobN8pQGw2-Z_ttBmzQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Encouraged by a few friends, we are starting a temporary web site for just
> one week, to track the increasingly DANGEROUS hurricane Irene and all the
> related bird reports, from Florida up to maritime Canada. Not sure how
> useful this will be, but we will give it a try. Hopefully we will have lots
> of "hurricane birds" and this site will provide one convenient centralized
> picture of all those hurricane-bird-reports along this thousand miles of
> coastline, and nearby. If there aren't any hurricane birds, there wont be
> much to report. We will get our data by manually checking every one of the
> twenty bird listserv sites along the East Coast, every day for one week, and
> add relevant references and links into our one site...
> http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/
>
> More importantly, hopefully Irene will not hurt anyone. Be careful, this is
> starting to look like a very dangerous storm, with forecast of a possible
> deadly storm surge hitting the East Coast, including New England....
> http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=1899
>
> Tom Robben
> Glastonbury CT
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:16:54 -0400 (EDT)
> From: mhmoorep at aol.com
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] mini-habitats
> Message-ID: <8CE31837277A367-A6C-18125 at webmail-d054.sysops.aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>
> I suspect many of have shared Paul's amazement at what can show up in mini-habitats. I was at the Wallingford Super Stop & Shop a few years ago after a heavy morning shower, and the busy parking lot held 70 or 80 peeps exploring the puddles.
>
>
>
> Marty Moore
> Wallingford
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:30:15 +0000 (GMT)
> From: lpflynn at optonline.net
> To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Cockenoe Island Westport
> Message-ID: <e55ab358b94f.4e56bee7 at optonline.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> For the past three years I have followed AMERICAN
> OYSTERCATCHERS staging this time of year on the Norwalk Islands, in all of those years Crow Island was the place for this gathering, with numbers as high a 63. Today there was only 1.
> This year the birds are not assembling on Crow Island but rather on
> Cockenoe Island, Tina Green has been spotting this group from the mainland shore for about a week. I checked each island today by boat to confirm that they in fact did move.
> Also on
> Cockenoe Island were 3 juv BLACK SKIMMERS, 1 FORSTER'S TERN along with 120 COMMON TERNS, mostly young still being fed by adults.
> Larry Flynn
> Norwalk Islands, Fairfield, US-CT
> Aug 25, 2011 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     52
> amoy were on cockenoe
> 16 species
>
> Double-crested Cormorant  100
> Great Egret  5
> Snowy Egret  2
> Black-crowned Night-Heron  1
> Osprey  7
> Black-bellied Plover  6
> Semipalmated Plover  25
> American Oystercatcher  53     52 staging on cockenoe island, 1 on crow island
> Ruddy Turnstone  30
> Laughing Gull  40
> Herring Gull  60
> Great Black-backed Gull  40
> Least Tern  1
> Common Tern  120
> Forster's Tern  1
> Black Skimmer  3
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v2 (http://ebird.org)
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:38:45 -0400 (EDT)
> From: streatham2003 at aol.com
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Sunrise Birding weekend walk moved to Saturday
> Message-ID: <8CE31868066E121-22F8-7EF5D at webmail-m028.sysops.aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>
> Hi All,
>
> I just wanted to let people know that the Sunrise Birding walk for this Sunday has been moved to the Saturday. Last time a couple of people just showed up without booking, so although unlikely that anyone might try to do so this on this particular Sunday I thought I best just send out a warning in case. I guess if I were really hardcore I'd keep the walk on the Sunday - could be interesting ;)
>
> Just a quick view on the hurricane. Although at this current time safety rather than birds is a priority, I thought it worth mentioning that even if you don't live near the coast this kind of weather can still bring interesting birds. During one of the more recent tropical storms (which actually turned into something of a damp squib) I was rather thrilled to discover a couple of Semi-P Plovers at Allen's Meadows in Wilton for the patch list. Inland reservoirs and open spaces like ballfields can certainly turn up something relatively exciting. I'm sure people will post more on possibilities anon. Personally I'll be keeping my eyes open for something interesting over the hawkwatch on the Monday and hoping we keep power and don't lose too many trees.
>
> Luke Tiller, Greenwich
> www.underclearskies.com
> www.sunrisebirding.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 17:51:40 -0400
> From: "Marty Swanhall" <mswanhall at earthlink.net>
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Solitary Sandpiper
> Message-ID: <7AAF46956DAE41A29A619A1EA4C2C5D2 at SwanhallPC>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Saw a  solitary Sandpiper and Great Blue Heron in wetlands on South Pomperaug Road in Woodbury on my way home from work today.
>
> Marty in Woodbury
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 19:47:17 -0400
> From: Randy Given <givenrandy at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Peregrine Falcons at Riverside Park ?
> Message-ID:
>    <CABzQ++UUwR7pZM04D-xEVh11nUgSv8Gf2CnWHZp0BQY1kWPLNg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> I've seen several postings about Peregrine Falcons at Riverside Park,
> but I haven't seen any myself. Granted, they're not that common. Were
> they seen there or were they seen flying over Hartford from there?
>
> Randy Given
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 1642, Issue 2
> ****************************************


From ktjensen at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 20:33:05 2011
From: ktjensen at gmail.com (Kevin Jensen)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 20:33:05 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Luna Barn Owl - rehab lost bird?
Message-ID: <BF1304AC-7BC0-4445-81B3-781AAD4148D8@gmail.com>

Has anyone seen the Connecticut Facebook story about a lost barn owl?  Supposedly imprinted and friendly to humans. Not likely to handle the wild. From canton area? Canton Raptor Care. Just putting the word out.

Sent from my Verizon iPhone 4

From rmharvey at snet.net  Thu Aug 25 21:23:47 2011
From: rmharvey at snet.net (Roy Harvey)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 18:23:47 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Luna Barn Owl - rehab lost bird?
In-Reply-To: <BF1304AC-7BC0-4445-81B3-781AAD4148D8@gmail.com>
Message-ID: <1314321827.84025.YahooMailClassic@web81503.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

> Has anyone seen the Connecticut
> Facebook story about a lost barn owl?? Supposedly
> imprinted and friendly to humans. Not likely to handle the
> wild. From canton area? Canton Raptor Care. Just putting the
> word out.

Patrick Comins posted a message about it on 7 August, but there is nothing wrong with another reminder.

http://lists.ctbirding.org/pipermail/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org/Week-of-Mon-20110801/027403.html


Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT


From mantlik at sbcglobal.net  Thu Aug 25 22:12:04 2011
From: mantlik at sbcglobal.net (Frank Mantlik)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 19:12:04 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Fwd: Hurricane Birding tips
Message-ID: <1314324724.97707.YahooMailRC@web80010.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>


Hi all,
Here's some comments and birding tips, as well as safety reminders from VA 
birder Ned Brinkley, copied from the Va birding list-serve, via birdingonthe.net 
   (Ned is also the editor of ABA's excellent publication, North American 
Birds).  Much of the info is also applicable to other eastern states, including 
CT.  


Frank Mantlik
Stratford


Subject: Hurricane Irene
From: Ned Brinkley <23cahow AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:22:04 -0400


Hi all,  With a hurricane approaching, there has been much internet discussion 
of bird displacement and safety issues.  I thought I'd put in my usual two 
cents, based on past experiences with storms that made landfall in, or near, 
Virginia. The coming storm is forecast to do a great deal of damage to eastern 
North Carolina, and it's very likely that southeastern Virginia will experience 
high winds and widespread flooding over the weekend. Safety is the highest 
priority in birding after the passage of hurricanes, and no one should venture 
out until authorities declare it is safe to do so. Fallen power lines, flooded 
roads, falling trees are all hazards, and tornadoes can still pop up after the 
storm's center has passed.  That said, we stand to learn a great deal about the 
effects of such storms on birds and their populations by being recording the 
birds after such events.  Here are some possibilities for birding strategies 
after a storm's passage (and after an area is safe):  1) Inland lakes and 
reservoirs, especially large ones, harbor seabirds and shorebirds displaced by 
storms; Virginia has records of frigatebirds, all three jaegers, three gadfly 
petrels, four shearwaters, two storm-petrels, two tropical terns, almost all 
other terns, Sabine's Gull, and two-dozen shorebird species from such settings. 
And that is only from a handful of recorded hurricanes, notably Fran of 1996 and 
Isabel of 2003. Irene's forecast track is to the east of these storms', but many 
things can happen between now and Saturday. Even if the storm does pass off the 
coast of Virginia as forecast now, such spots are still worth checking.  2) 
River mouths and peninsulas near them can be very productive for seawatching; 
there are many interesting records of seabirds seen from such locations, 
including White-faced Storm-Petrel in Virginia.  3) Dredge-spoil areas such as 
Craney Island can be the site of "storm" roosts, large assemblages of terns, 
shorebirds, gulls, and skimmers, with all birds resting quietly, bills pointing 
into the wind. Bridled and Sooty Terns frequently sit with them.  4) Farm 
fields, especially harvested ones (harvested potato fields are optimal), can 
also be the site of storm roosts, but when wet or flooded, shorebirds are also 
found in numbers feeding in the muddy areas (or drier areas in the case of 
golden-plovers, Buff-breasted Sandpipers, Baird's Sandpipers, etc.). Even areas 
that have relatively little rain and wind can sometimes produce a surprise or 
two.  5) Open beaches.  Although storms that pass east of our coastlines do not 
tend to produce large numbers of sightings of seabirds, they sometimes do 
produce large numbers of seabirds on beaches, some of them in weakened 
condition, some of them dead.  Photographs of such birds are very valuable. All 
such specimens have even more value to science, so they should be salvaged and 
preserved (donated to museums).  Walking miles of beaches can produce dozens of 
interesting birds.  We still know very little about which taxa of Cory's 
Shearwater and Band-rumped Storm-Petrel visit our waters, for instance, so every 
specimen can provide another piece of the puzzle.  Yesterday, I photographed an 
adult Masked Booby off northeastern North Carolina, just a few miles from 
Virginia waters.  Our state has no report of this species, but it seems likely 
that Irene could displace such a bird a few miles northward.  Brown Boobies have 
been noted in recent weeks from Cape May, NJ, to Maine, so that is another bird 
to look for after the storm.  6) Almost anywhere. Records of odd things like 
Cave Swallows have popped up in odd places after recent hurricane landfalls, so 
looking at every bird carefully, no matter where you are, seems prudent. In 
theory, birds migrating at this time of year could be not just displaced by the 
storm but also "put down" by the storm, that is, stop migration and seek shelter 
in the nearest area.  Because landfall of the storm may occur in darkness, 
"grounded" migrants of many sorts should be looked for across a large area of 
the American East from Sunday through Tuesday.  The Virginia Avian Records 
Committee would be very grateful to receive reports of any storm-blown seabirds. 
Ideally, reports of these birds should be accompanied by photographs of the 
birds, for verification.  Because birding after a storm can be challenging, and 
because many seabirds are difficult to identify even by very experienced 
seabirders, there is no shame in recording a bird as "phalarope sp.,", "jaeger 
sp.", "storm-petrel sp.", or even "large tubenose" or "shorebird sp.".  It can 
be tempting to put a name on a bird seen poorly, but it's best to be 
conservative.  Let's hope that we avoid extensive damage in Virginia, of course, 
and that the storm douses the terrible Dismal Swamp fire (smoke is terrible this 
morning) and moves on out to sea.  Ned Brinkley Cape Charles, Va. 
_______________________________________________ va-bird mailing list 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird  Thank you for
subscribing to Va-bird, a service of the Virginia Society of  Ornithology.
Please consider joining the VSO.   http://www.virginiabirds.net/

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 22:50:07 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 22:50:07 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Birding Hurricane Irene (long)
Message-ID: <B16D625C-B092-45D7-B9C1-3829230A1F13@gmail.com>


Before I go into detail about birding this storm, a little perspective about these things. Hurricanes are serious storms, so I am told. In my adult life I?ve never sat through anything more than a tropical depression. For us here in southern New England, Hurricanes Bob (1991) and Gloria (1985) are probably distant memories for most people. I vaguely recall sitting on our enclosed porch in Bridgeport as a child, waiting out the wind and rain of Bob. We?ve seen via the media that poor preparation coupled with bad luck can cause disaster, so let?s all be as safe and smart as possible.


Switching gears to the birds, many displaced seabirds do presumably perish, especially those found on lakes hundreds of miles inland. Also, many migrant passerines and shorebirds are negatively affected by these systems. It is very unfortunate, but it is nature at work.


But as birders, we can?t help but let our attention shift partially to the silver-lining of tropical cyclones. Here are some quotes from folks who have summed up the situation quite well in recent years:


??but then I reminded myself that no one has control over the weather, and that birders are simply taking meteorological lemons and making lemonade.? ? Scott Weidensaul


??there is no more radical or rapid change in bird status and distribution than during and after a tropical cyclone that makes landfall. We regularly scramble to locate birds after most other meteorological phenomena, whether warm front, cold front, fogbank, or snowstorm, so surely we would not ignore tropical weather systems, despite their awful costs. We are students of the here and now, after all.? ? Edward S. Brinkley


Now, onto that silver lining.


If Hurricane Irene does indeed make landfall at or near Connecticut, this would be the first such local event of the internet, cell phone, and digital camera eras. Bob and Gloria passed through (or near) before we were all connected via smartphones, before the days of posting to listservs from the field, or even making phone calls from the field. Rarities could not be documented with photographs with ease like they are today. And I believe that back then, only 20-30 years ago, birders were not fully aware of the best storm-birding strategies. Those who have been birding locally for decades will probably attest to this.


After barreling through the heart of the Bahamas, Hurricane Irene will emerge into Gulf Stream waters. From here she is forecast to move NNE, possibly making landfill in eastern North Carolina before moving up the coast. The storm could hit west of us, east of us, or pass right overhead. With so much uncertainty left in the track, it is impossible to try to predict the best areas to go birding during (if safe enough) and after the storm.


The storm?s sheer size and track (originating in the Cape Verde region, organizing just east of the Caribbean, skirting the northeast Caribbean islands, then through the Bahamas and the Gulf Stream) certainly gives us potential for a variety of seabirds, shorebirds, and terns we would otherwise have little or no chance of seeing in Long Island Sound or inland. The track hasn?t gone over much deep ocean, with most of the recent track being over waters on the Continental Shelf, which may hurt us bird-wise. However this is a large storm, and its ?right? side will have spent some time off the edge of the shelf.


It would appear, from reading accounts of recent storm passages, that there are no guarantees with these things. But, generally speaking, the ?birdiest? quadrant is usually the ?right-front? quadrant, which not surprisingly is also usually the strongest part of the storm. So, if the storm was heading due north, the northeastern quadrant would be the ?right-front? quadrant. In general, the birdiest scenario would occur if the storm passes directly over us or just to our west (which would put us on the east side of the storm and give us some of that right-front quadrant). The sample size isn?t large enough to tell us exactly how significant this is, but one could argue that for greatest birdlife we would rather it hit 150 miles to our west than just 50 miles to our east, accepting more time over land for weaking in order for us to be on the east side of it. FYI those mileages are arbitrary numbers, just thrown in there to make a point.


Birders will no doubt be scattered throughout the state, probably both Sunday during the storm and early Monday after its passage. The key for us will be to KEEP IN TOUCH. Bring your cell phones (for safety if for nothing else). If you find a rarity or something you think might be rare, call someone on your typical rare bird phone tree to get word out. If you have a smartphone, post to CTBirds along with making phone calls. Storm-blown waifs sometimes do linger for hours on inland bodies of water. Coastal flybys are less likely to linger, but it is still worth getting word out with a direction of the bird?s flight. Remember the American White Pelicans from a couple autumns ago? We tracked those birds over dozens of miles in one day?s flight. A jaeger moving east from Stamford could very well pass Stratford Point later on, so a heads-up is always a good idea.


Also, if you can, take a photo. Distant seabirds can be very difficult to identify, especially if you?re not an experienced seabirder or if viewing conditions are poor. Snapping off a few photos for later analysis could be the difference between certain identification and frustration. Also, the ARCC would love as much documentation as possible for the official record. With a concentrated effort, we have the opportunity to add to the growing data regarding tropical cyclones and their redistribution of entrained birds. We have much to learn.


We will be faced with the decision of whether to hit the coast or check larger inland bodies of water. Which bodies? Rivers or lakes? If the coast, east or west? Point of land or river mouth? It really is a crapshoot in the end, though the exact storm track will help us. As the track becomes more certain, we?ll know more about important things such as duration, intensity, and direction of the winds including approximate times the winds will shift direction.


What birds can we expect? Again, there are no guarantees, but if landfall occurs in CT, some species are more likely than others.


The tropical terns first come to mind, Sooty and Bridled. Most storms record greater numbers of Sooty Tern than Bridled, though this isn?t always the case. Other terns, such as Royal, Sandwich, and Gull-billed are possible. Good numbers of Black Tern are likely, and Black Skimmer numbers may increase as well. Really any tern that occurs in our region is possible, whether truly moved by the storm or just knocked down by the inclement weather locally, including Roseate and Caspian too.


Tubenoses, always rare in CT waters except for maybe Wilson?s Storm-Petrel, may be represented by any of the following: Black-capped Petrel or rarer Pterodromas are possible, any of five shearwater species, and we?ll say 4 species of storm-petrel (I?ll include White-faced because CT?s 1976 record of this species came thanks to Hurricane Belle. It occurred at the mouth of the Housatonic River, exactly where the center of circulation made landfall).


If you?re exceedingly lucky, a tropicbird or frigatebird isn?t out of the question. And while boobies are usually not associated with these storms, the recent presence of three Brown Boobies between New Jersey and Maine raise this possibility.


More likely are jaegers?any of the three species are possible with Parasitic being the most likely by a wide margin. Normally I would say Pomarine is next in line, but given that we?re in the heart of Long-tailed migration and early for most migrant Poms, Long-tailed may be our second most likely jaeger. Either skua, while highly unlikely, is still possible.


As for gulls, we?re pretty much guaranteed (there, I said it!) an uptick in Laughing Gull numbers. More exciting would be a Sabine?s Gull, which, since they migrate overland in very small numbers, might be just as likely to be knocked down as genuinely displaced (This also goes for jaegers, phalaropes, and some terns.).


Then there?s the shorebirds. Good ol? reliable shorebirds. If this storm largely misses us and only provides a breezy rain, we?ll still have more shorebirds downed by the weather. More of the common species, plus increased chances of Hudsonian Godwits, American Golden-Plovers, and Red & Red-necked Phalaropes (Red-necked more likely than Red).


And we may as well think outside the box. How about a rare swift, swallow, or martin from the Caribbean? Doug Gochfeld mentioned White-cheeked Pintail to me the other day?and why not? Keep an open mind, and try to document anything strange.


Any of these are possible, but even a direct hit would likely deliver only some of them.


As of right now, the timeline seems to indicate worsening conditions throughout Sunday with the worst weather during Sunday PM. There appears a decent chance that the nasty weather continues after dark on Sunday. If this is the case, Monday morning AFTER the storm may well yield the best birding. Birds dropped in CT during the storm and overnight will likely try to reorient toward the ocean, meaning they could be seen leaving LI Sound or exiting the major rivers. They could also awake to find only inland lakes or flooded parking lots below them. Which inland bodies of water? Again, if there?s landfall in CT, follow the track of the eye. If not, try to head wherever that right-front quadrant passed through. Alternatively, if the eye passes east of CT, I?d think that getting as far east as possible would be the way to go.


Well, now that I?ve gone through all that, I guess it pretty much means the storm will be a miss. You?re welcome :)


Be safe,
Nick


References
Armistead, G. L & Sullivan B. L. 2004. Birding Hurricane Isabel. Birding 36: 6, pages 616-624.
Brinkley, E. S. 2011. The Changing Seasons: Bedfellows. North American Birds 65: 1, pages 17-20.
Zeranski, J. D. & Baptist T. R. 1990. Connecticut Birds, page 41.




Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com


From nbonomo at gmail.com  Thu Aug 25 23:57:26 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 23:57:26 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Milford Point this morning
In-Reply-To: <CAEhpbrVtraSKYW+aTdjq=TQ1M0gLbZducqo4k1FYgHqWjQy0CA@mail.gmail.com>
References: <CAEhpbrVtraSKYW+aTdjq=TQ1M0gLbZducqo4k1FYgHqWjQy0CA@mail.gmail.com>
Message-ID: <CABgXtNfbO=_yp3YUpMtebmt7-V71p+fxz6t6aKa1H24=Fe-vgg@mail.gmail.com>

Not much to add to Charlie's report, except that the RED KNOT count
got up to an impressive 13 birds (one adult, the rest juvs...none
flagged), and a single juv PECTORAL SANDPIPER dropped in for a few
minutes.

Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com

On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 3:32 PM, charles barnard jr <chbarnjr at gmail.com> wrote:
> This morning between 8:30 and 10:30, at the high tide, I birded Milford
> Point (the LIS side) mostly with Nick Bonomo, but also Dennis Varza and
> Charles Hills for a little while. ? Here are my numbers of the more uncommon
> species, which may vary from those of Nick and others.: Black Tern (3),
> Forster's Tern (3), Black Skimmer (4), ?Red Knot (8), Stilt Sandpiper (1).
>
> ?More common species included about ?450 Common Terns, 1 Least Tern, 35
> Short-billed Dowitcher, Black-bellied Plover (110), ?Semipalmated Plover
> (150), Sanderling (80), Semipalmated Sandpiper (400), Ruddy Turnstone (2),
> American Oystercatcher (2) and Lesser Yellowlegs (1) There were also 2
> Peregrine Falcons present.
>
> ?Nick was still birding when I left, so maybe he will expand this list
> later.
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>


From davewb07 at sbcglobal.net  Fri Aug 26 06:41:13 2011
From: davewb07 at sbcglobal.net (John D Babington)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 03:41:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Hurrican Irene,
not good for bird migrants but good for common sense birding
Message-ID: <1314355273.35042.YahooMailNeo@web81108.mail.mud.yahoo.com>


I feel very sorry for all the bird migrants who will likely run into big problems with Hurricane Irene. I know Hurricane Irene will blow into Connecticut some very interesting birds but hopefully Connecticut birders will use common sense and NOT go birding on Sunday. As I recall a day after a hurricane hit Cape May in New Jersey the birding was amazing. Assuming one can get out safely on Monday to Connecticut's birding "hot spots" the birding should be amazing,? migrating birds blown back to Connecticut by the hurricane and sea birds blown into Connecticut by the hurricane.


David W Babington
Washington, CT

From dennisvz at optonline.net  Fri Aug 26 07:39:45 2011
From: dennisvz at optonline.net (Dennis Varza)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 07:39:45 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Birding the Hurricane
Message-ID: <7D7B8A76-E434-4419-B120-212111365FE9@optonline.net>


Hi Folks


Considering my past experiences with hurricanes and past records.  
here are some thoughts.


There are two types of birds the seabirds (shearwaters, petrels,  
Tropicbirds etc.) and Coast-birds (Caspian Tern, Royal Tern, Skimmers  
Etc.).
The coast-birds increase in number and tend to hang around a few  
days. The seabirds, tend to leave quickly and one needs to be looking  
as soon as possibles. This conflicts with safety policy. You can  
expect most favored areas for birding to be closed either due to  
flooding or fear of people going into the water. It will be a  
challenge to find good viewing. An example in Bridgeport, I would bet  
Seaside Park to be closed, but St. Mary' s has a chance of being open.


There are many inland records of shearwaters and petrels, if not  
exhausted and in someone's backyard, they will be found on lakes and  
the larger rivers. People who do not live closet to shore should be  
checking these out. If I was in the Hartford area I would try to get  
a view of the Connecticut River and see what flies by. Middletown  
would be another good area. I would check out any large lake and  
reservoir. Think about lakes that have a history of loons, grebes and  
scoters using them. Again time is of the essence, once they get their  
bearing they are out of here.


Dennis Varza
Fairfield


From pcianfaglione at hotmail.com  Fri Aug 26 07:49:35 2011
From: pcianfaglione at hotmail.com (paul cianfaglione)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 11:49:35 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Pond
Message-ID: <BLU135-W27B5A3AB9A398A5314B42DBB130@phx.gbl>



8/26 East Hartford, Cabela's Pond  -   1 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER continues @ 7:20 am. Only stayed fifteen minutes, more sandpipers still coming in as I left.

Paul Cianfaglione
Canton  

From petermgreen at hotmail.com  Fri Aug 26 10:14:25 2011
From: petermgreen at hotmail.com (Tina and Peter Green)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 14:14:25 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Westport WW Scoter
Message-ID: <BLU145-W18BCAE84CA8E7CCC807DF2AF130@phx.gbl>


8/26/11 - Westport - Compo Beach - The White-winged Scoter continues on the Soundview Avenue section of Compo Beach,yesterday afternoon sitting on shore and this morning just offshore.

Tina Green
Westport
   

From LPBAUSHER at COMCAST.NET  Fri Aug 26 10:46:13 2011
From: LPBAUSHER at COMCAST.NET (Larry Bausher)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 10:46:13 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] New Haven Bird Club September Schedule
Message-ID: <E0297CAD-DBD1-415E-AC97-C4F43E36DCA1@COMCAST.NET>

Folks,

After the avian fallout from Irene dissipates, be sure to check out
the New Haven Bird Club's schedule of activities for September:

Indoor Meeting:

Thursday, September 8 ? Sam Fried, Warblers and Vireos of Eastern
North America.  Free and open to the public.  The Jones Auditorium of
the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington St.,
New Haven, CT.  Social half-hour at 7:00, program begins at 7:30. For
more information: www.newhavenbirdclub.org or call 203 230-1697.  Now
that ?warbler necks? are healed, let?s take a closer?and easier?look
at the roughly 38 species of eastern wood warblers and 7 species of
vireos that had us all bent over backwards in awe last spring.
Tonight we?ll explore these birds? life histories, migration routes,
wintering grounds, and breeding locations throughout the western
hemisphere.  With a wonderful array of color photos, Sam?s
presentation will provide a fun, fascinating, and ?gentle-on-the-
neck? revisit with these true gems of the bird kingdom. Sam is an
avid and longtime birder, a past president of Hartford Audubon, and
the founder of Flights of Fancy Adventures, a birding, photography,
natural history, and golf travel company. In his travels Sam has
amassed a vast collection of great photos, many featured in the more
than 50 articles he has authored for field guides, books, newspapers,
and magazines worldwide. And along with running Flights of Fancy
trips to North, Central, and South American birding destinations, the
ever-inquisitive Sam now is a golf and fishing writer too.

Field Trips:

Daily Hawk Watch at Lighthouse Point.  September 1 to November 30.
Lighthouse Point on New Haven Harbor is one of the premier locations
in southern New England for watching migrating eagles, hawks and
falcons as well as good numbers of songbirds. The watch starts at 7
AM daily and continues as long as the hawks keep flying. Stop by
anytime. Coordinator: Steve Mayo, 203-393-0694 or smayo at sikorsky.com.

First Wednesday Walk : Sandy Point, West Haven.  Wednesday, Sept. 7,
8:00 AM. Free and open to the public.   Join us as we look for
shorebirds and terns at this excellent local birding location.  Black
Skimmers, Roseate Terns, and a variety of shorebirds are possible,
including Golden Plover.  Meet at the parking lot opposite the former
Captain?s Galley Restaurant on Beach Street.  Wear footwear that you
won?t mind getting wet as the walk may involve wading in shallow
water.  Leader: John Oshlick.  Contact person: Tina Green: 203
247-2660 or tina at renaissancestudios.com.

Lighthouse Point Bird Walk and Prep for Migration Festival.
Saturday, Sept. 17, 8:00 AM. Free and open to the public.  Park
Ranger Dan Barvir and Arne Rosengren will lead the bird walk. Meet at
the Hawk Watch parking lot at Lighthouse Point on New Haven Harbor.
Then at about 9:30 AM, we will perform some light trail maintenance
and cleanup. This is a great way to enjoy looking at birds and help
preserve their habitat.  Leaders?Dan Barvir: 203.946.6086 and Arne
Rosengren: 203.248.2903

Ninth Annual Migration Festival at Lighthouse Point Park.  Sunday,
September 25, 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM.  This festive event is sponsored by
the New Haven Parks Dept., the New Haven Bird Club, and other fine
organizations.  In addition to hawk watching, there will be bird
banding demonstrations, a live raptor demonstration, bird walks, and
other activities. Organizer?Park Ranger Dan Barvir: 203.946.6086.
NHBC contact-Maria Stockmal: 203.488.3876, m.stockmal at snet.net, or
visit www.newhavenbirdclub.org.

Thanks,
Larry Bausher, West Haven
NHBC Publicity Director



From charsjs at sbcglobal.net  Fri Aug 26 13:47:21 2011
From: charsjs at sbcglobal.net (Stephen Spector)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 10:47:21 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Seaside Sparrow
Message-ID: <1314380841.87336.YahooMailRC@web180011.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>

>From Steve & Charla Spector:
8/26/11 -- Milford Pt -- in the Spatina next to the Piping Plover spit, a
juvenile Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus).? For a record shot,
www.stevesbirds.blogspot.com
?charsjs at sbcglobal.net

From robben99 at gmail.com  Fri Aug 26 15:13:48 2011
From: robben99 at gmail.com (Thomas Robben)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 15:13:48 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] No "hurricane bird" reports yet, as of 3pm 8/26
Message-ID: <CANpJbq2yEH+wHqJRPW9WsA80ySbz-ddyz-fBWbPjYvYNy1Hb7g@mail.gmail.com>


As expected, no "hurricane Irene birds" have been reported yet anywhere from
Florida north along the East Coast.  Maybe saturday, sunday or monday.  And
please remember to put safety first, ahead of everything else.
Tom Robben, Glastonbury CT
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/

From paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com  Fri Aug 26 15:34:14 2011
From: paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com (Paul Desjardins)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 15:34:14 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Milford Point
Message-ID: <5C2B86C8-BF4E-4DBC-8322-2DF3381FCE1A@gmail.com>

This afternoon among the numerous Common Terns one Black Tern.


From kevin.burgio at gmail.com  Fri Aug 26 16:03:46 2011
From: kevin.burgio at gmail.com (Kevin Burgio)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 16:03:46 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] UConn Collections and Hurricane Irene
Message-ID: <CACO8dcz7Xn-kh_GKDhbZuocDKPBXux23JEW=mCjiATWP8FTD1Q@mail.gmail.com>


All,


A message from us up at the UConn Ornithology Lab:


As you bird the state after Hurricane Irene, you may encounter wounded,
dying or dead birds. A reminder: state and federal laws regulate who can
"possess"  wild birds, bird bodies, or body parts (including feathers).
Injured birds should be handled by licensed rehabilitators. Under the terms
of the salvage permit held by the Ornithological Research Collections
manager at the University of Connecticut, you MAY pick up dead birds for
transfer to the Collection, and we are seeking any specimens that you may
encounter. The Ornithological Research Collections at the University of
Connecticut is a library of birds that have occurred in the state; the study
skin collection dates from 1875, and holds more Connecticut specimens than
any other in the world. The ongoing record is being built ONLY with salvaged
specimens --- dead birds picked up and preserved. You can contribute to the
historical record by securing any dead bird you encounter in a plastic bag,
sealed shut with as little air in it as possible. Note the DATE, LOCATION,
SPECIES (if you know it), and YOUR NAME AND CONTACT information, either on
the bag, or double bag the bird with notes between inner and outer bag.
FREEZE THE SPECIMEN as soon as possible and contact either
margaret.rubega at uconn.edu or susan.hochgraf at uconn.edu  for transfer/pickup.
Good birding, and be careful out there!


Best,
___________________________________
Kevin Burgio
Ph.D. Student
University of Connecticut
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Dept
U-3043 75 No. Eagleville Road
Storrs, CT  06269-3043
kevin.burgio at uconn.edu
(860) 486-3839
http://www.eeb.uconn.edu/people/burgio

From northernrail at comcast.net  Fri Aug 26 16:52:53 2011
From: northernrail at comcast.net (John Ogren)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 13:52:53 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] WW Scoter
Message-ID: <1314391973.47471.YahooMailNeo@web80407.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

Tina,
?? Does the WW Scoter show any signs of a damaged lower bill? I had one in Old Saybrook that hung around into late May/June. It appeared that his lower bill was split and about 2/3's of it was just hanging. I tried to capture it with the assistance of a rehabber, but the bird was able to elude us. I monitered it for several weeks. ?It was managing to catch and eat green crabs and other crustaceans in our marsh.
? Interesting enough Jerry Connolly spotted a Scoter off of Hammo about a week or two after my bird had left.
John Ogren

From streatham2003 at aol.com  Fri Aug 26 16:53:49 2011
From: streatham2003 at aol.com (streatham2003 at aol.com)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 16:53:49 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Common Nighhawks - Audubon Greenwich
Message-ID: <8CE324963A8D536-79C-7A6F@webmail-m079.sysops.aol.com>


 Hi All,

There are currently 150-200 Common Nighthawks actively feeding over the Audubon Center in Greenwich - pretty cool stuff.

Luke Tiller, Greenwich





From mswanhall at earthlink.net  Fri Aug 26 17:32:09 2011
From: mswanhall at earthlink.net (Marty Swanhall)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 17:32:09 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Solitary Sandpiper
Message-ID: <A667F9436773445496D393E98E68094D@SwanhallPC>

Saw 2 Solitary Sandpipers in wetland area on South Pomperaug Road in Woodbury on way home today

Marty in Woodbury

From pfavreau at cox.net  Fri Aug 26 18:28:32 2011
From: pfavreau at cox.net (pfavreau at cox.net)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 18:28:32 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Baird's Sandpiper
Message-ID: <20110826182832.WVKHC.1544161.imail@eastrmwml47>

>From Patrice Favreau:
08/26/11 - East Hartford Cabela's Pond,10:00-10:30AM- 1 Baird's Sandpiper, 1 imm Wood Duck, 2 Spotted Sandpiper, 2 Lesser Yellowlegs, 2 Least Sandpiper, possible 2 Semipalmated Sandpiper but flew off, 1 Green Heron, numerous Killdeer & Savannah Sparrows around, 1 Am Kestrel way back behind fence behind pond, 32 Canada Goose (no collars)


--
Patrice


From pfavreau at cox.net  Fri Aug 26 18:45:54 2011
From: pfavreau at cox.net (pfavreau at cox.net)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 18:45:54 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Night Heron
Message-ID: <20110826184554.AQPHP.1544319.imail@eastrmwml47>

>From Patrice Favreau:
08/26/11 - South Windsor, private/corporate pond across from Park&Ride on Ellington Rd at intersection of Rte5, around 3PM - juv Black-crowned Night Heron, Green Heron, DC Cormorant, Spotted Sandpiper, GB Heron, several Mallards, 200 Canada Geese (five with neck bands)
--
Patrice


From birdgirrl at comcast.net  Fri Aug 26 20:44:39 2011
From: birdgirrl at comcast.net (Susanne Shrader)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 20:44:39 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Avon COMMON NIGHTHAWKS
Message-ID: <F1BDC021-3822-45CB-90E4-44538EAB83A9@comcast.net>

From Susanne Shrader:
08/26/2011-Avon, Tillotson Rd at road reconstruction site-- 20-25 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS hawking.

Susanne Shrader
birdgirrl at comcast.net






From robben99 at gmail.com  Fri Aug 26 21:10:34 2011
From: robben99 at gmail.com (Thomas Robben)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 21:10:34 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] FIRST HURRICANE BIRDS for Irene are from SouthCarolina
Message-ID: <CANpJbq2imbqZXbpAj3zog-S5m7eS=k2qQ9ww_3O9qhmsjSPwFQ@mail.gmail.com>


South Carolina reports the first "hurricane birds" late today.
Its a good start!
All internet list reports of hurricane birds will be summarized on this
website daily for this one week...
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/


If you use eBird to report any hurricane birds seen, please also report them
directly to your state listserv (such as this CTbirds) so that we can pull
together a complete picture of this hurricane's birds.


Tom Robben
Glastonbury CT
======================
8:31 PM  Friday August 26
Hi Tom - in South Carolina, Brown Noddy, Sooty Tern, and a couple of
frigatebirds were seen this evening.
Andrew Dasinger

From mjwarner at optonline.net  Fri Aug 26 22:10:50 2011
From: mjwarner at optonline.net (Mike Warner)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 22:10:50 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] OT:Governor Malloy Message
Message-ID: <F4CB94BAE71A4BC58ECED27635F74E5A@OfficePC>




Hi,


     Governor Malloy gives a 14 minute video message about how the state will deal with Hurricane Irene .  This includes closing the Merritt Parkway and WIlbur Cross on midnight Saturday.  There is no mention of when they will re-open.


http://www.news12.com/index.jsp




Mike Warner
Wilton, CT.

From carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net  Fri Aug 26 22:29:08 2011
From: carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net (Carrier Graphics)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 19:29:08 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] 45 Nighthawks
Message-ID: <1314412148.24708.YahooMailRC@web81803.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

At 6:30, 45 Nighthawks flew over the yard here in Harwinton all headed due
North. Does anyone know why they do this when south or West is the best way to
the tropics?
 I have noticed this habit of flying due North for years late in the day. Are
they seeking insects or are they seeing other Nighthawks feeding to the North of
them?

Paul Carrier - Harwinton

From gypsy.carol at charter.net  Fri Aug 26 22:44:55 2011
From: gypsy.carol at charter.net (Carol Bauby)
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 22:44:55 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] 45 Nighthawks
In-Reply-To: <1314412148.24708.YahooMailRC@web81803.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
References: <1314412148.24708.YahooMailRC@web81803.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Message-ID: <4E585A27.5060605@charter.net>

Paul,

I'm jealous.  We were sitting in the yard here in Harwinton, watching
for them at that time.  Didn't see a one.

    ~Carol

On 8/26/2011 10:29 PM, Carrier Graphics wrote:
> At 6:30, 45 Nighthawks flew over the yard here in Harwinton all headed due
> North. Does anyone know why they do this when south or West is the best way to
> the tropics?
>   I have noticed this habit of flying due North for years late in the day. Are
> they seeking insects or are they seeing other Nighthawks feeding to the North of
> them?
>
> Paul Carrier - Harwinton
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>


From mresch8702 at aol.com  Sat Aug 27 06:09:10 2011
From: mresch8702 at aol.com (mresch8702 at aol.com)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 06:09:10 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Baird's Sandpiper, 3 PM, 8/27
In-Reply-To: <1314380841.87336.YahooMailRC@web180011.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
References: <1314380841.87336.YahooMailRC@web180011.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
Message-ID: <8CE32B87F746D70-1058-DA41@webmail-d054.sysops.aol.com>


A Baird's Sandpiper was present at the Cabela's pond in East Hartford at 3 PM on Friday (8/27).  Other birds present were -

8 Least Sandpipers
3 Spotted Sandpipers
1 Solitary Sandpiper
Many Killdeer
1 Im. Green Heron - flew in from ??
30 Canada Geese - including several juveniles still smaller than the adults
1 Savannah Sparrow (acting like a shorebird)

It's interesting that the Baird's was not present from 2:30 to 3 PM - 3 of us searched every inch of the pond edges with no luck.  I was about to give up and then all of a sudden the Baird's was there!  Not sure if it was in the grass surrounding the pond as Baird's like to do, or whether it flew in from elsewhere.  The Green Heron flew in while we were there too, so maybe there is additional habitat nearby.  In any case, if you don't see the bird when you first arrive you might stick around for a while.


Mike Resch
Pepperell, MA
www.statebirding.blogspot.com


From mresch8702 at aol.com  Sat Aug 27 06:27:39 2011
From: mresch8702 at aol.com (mresch8702 at aol.com)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 06:27:39 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Baird's Sandpiper, 3 PM, 8/27
In-Reply-To: <8CE32B87F746D70-1058-DA41@webmail-d054.sysops.aol.com>
References: <1314380841.87336.YahooMailRC@web180011.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
<8CE32B87F746D70-1058-DA41@webmail-d054.sysops.aol.com>
Message-ID: <8CE32BB14D17327-1058-DBC5@webmail-d054.sysops.aol.com>

That was actually on Friday 8/26 - not 8/27.  (another of those senior moments I'm afraid...)


Mike Resch


-----Original Message-----
From: mresch8702 <mresch8702 at aol.com>
To: ctbirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Sent: Sat, Aug 27, 2011 6:09 am
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Baird's Sandpiper, 3 PM, 8/27



 Baird's Sandpiper was present at the Cabela's pond in East Hartford at 3 PM on
riday (8/27).  Other birds present were -
8 Least Sandpipers
 Spotted Sandpipers
 Solitary Sandpiper
any Killdeer
 Im. Green Heron - flew in from ??
0 Canada Geese - including several juveniles still smaller than the adults
 Savannah Sparrow (acting like a shorebird)
It's interesting that the Baird's was not present from 2:30 to 3 PM - 3 of us
earched every inch of the pond edges with no luck.  I was about to give up and
hen all of a sudden the Baird's was there!  Not sure if it was in the grass
urrounding the pond as Baird's like to do, or whether it flew in from
lsewhere.  The Green Heron flew in while we were there too, so maybe there is
dditional habitat nearby.  In any case, if you don't see the bird when you
irst arrive you might stick around for a while.

ike Resch
epperell, MA
ww.statebirding.blogspot.com
_______________________________________________
his list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for
he discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
or subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org


From pcianfaglione at hotmail.com  Sat Aug 27 08:22:48 2011
From: pcianfaglione at hotmail.com (paul cianfaglione)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 12:22:48 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's Pond
Message-ID: <BLU135-W196043648154A07E54A2EBB120@phx.gbl>


8/27 East Hartford, Cabela's Pond  -  1 BAIRD'S SANDPIPER continues,  1 AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER flying over field calling.

Paul Cianfaglione and Rick Macsuga  

From streatham2003 at aol.com  Sat Aug 27 09:47:53 2011
From: streatham2003 at aol.com (streatham2003 at aol.com)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 09:47:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] New US BIrd Species Discovered
Message-ID: <8CE32D70D5B6F44-60C-FCDC@Webmail-d123.sysops.aol.com>


 Hi All,

Thought people might find this interesting? Perhaps a chance to look for the second record this weekend ;) http://m.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/08/new-shearwater-species/  Looking forward to being able to ask Peter Pyle about this when he gives his talk at Audubon Greenwich this fall.

Luke Tiller, Greenwich






From petermgreen at hotmail.com  Sat Aug 27 10:15:49 2011
From: petermgreen at hotmail.com (Tina and Peter Green)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 14:15:49 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Westport WW Scoter still here
Message-ID: <BLU145-W29CAB6CEAE5B9825F6280EAF120@phx.gbl>


8/27/11 - Westport - Compo Beach (Soundview Avenue) - White-winged Scoter continues on the beach this morning, preening and looking quite healthy. I still have not seen this bird feeding. The views of this bird have been excellent,even with just your bins!

Note: I continue to post this bird as I have received several emails regarding it's condition,etc.

Tina Green
Westport

   

From davewb07 at sbcglobal.net  Sat Aug 27 12:55:31 2011
From: davewb07 at sbcglobal.net (John D Babington)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 09:55:31 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Great crested flycatcher, Washington, CT
Message-ID: <1314464131.84544.YahooMailNeo@web81104.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

While running around our property here in Washington, CT in the late afternoon on Friday to get ready for Hurricane Irene I heard a great crested flycatcher. Since I have not a GCF around here in awhile I have to assume this one was a migrate. Sorry no "biggie" Hurricane Irene bird. Hope this GCF has no troubles with Irene in migration.

David W Babington
Washington, CT

From teustis at killingworthlibrary.org  Sat Aug 27 13:24:45 2011
From: teustis at killingworthlibrary.org (Tammy Eustis)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 17:24:45 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Great crested flycatcher, Washington, CT
Message-ID: <W6570614989104511314465885@webmail28>

Interesting... I heard a GCFC too, when I was just out for a "last" walk around the neighborhood. Otherwise, our area is eerily quiet - nowhere near the usual level of bird activity. A few stray juveniles: mourning doves, cardinals, woodpeckers; and the hummingbirds. I'll definitely take stock again after Irene moves through.
~ Tammy Eustis, Chester
-----Original Message-----
From: John D Babington [mailto:davewb07 at sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2011 12:55 PM
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Great crested flycatcher, Washington, CT

While running around our property here in Washington, CT in the late afternoon on Friday to get ready for Hurricane Irene I heard a great crested flycatcher. Since I have not a GCF around here in awhile I have to assume this one was a migrate. Sorry no "biggie" Hurricane Irene bird. Hope this GCF has no troubles with Irene in migration. David W Babington Washington, CT _______________________________________________ This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut. For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org




From mantlik at sbcglobal.net  Sat Aug 27 13:44:19 2011
From: mantlik at sbcglobal.net (Frank Mantlik)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 10:44:19 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Ww scorer
Message-ID: <1314467059.17399.yext-apple-iphone@web80007.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>

>From frank Mantlik
8/27 Stratford, short beach, 7am - male white-winged scorer, 700 common terns.

Sent from my iPod

From robben99 at gmail.com  Sat Aug 27 15:44:00 2011
From: robben99 at gmail.com (Thomas Robben)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 15:44:00 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Some Hurricane Birds from FLA and Carolinas [3pm]
Message-ID: <CANpJbq2g4YFLOkxcBbG7hLGFRscZQNUtb_j8HDoCjv1wY56adw@mail.gmail.com>


Florida and the Carolinas report a number of Sooty Terns and Bridled Terns
today 8/27, as of 3pm.


All internet listserv reports of hurricane birds will be summarized on this
website daily for this one week...
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/
which will be updated again this evening around 9pm.


If you use eBird to report any hurricane birds seen, as you should,
please also report them to your state listserv (such as this CTbirds)
so that we can find them and pull together a complete picture of this
hurricane's birds.


Lots of beaches and roads will be closed until the hurricane threat is past.
Put safety ahead of everything else and be careful.


Good news...That whimbrel that flew into Hurricane Irene apparently is alive
and transmitting its radio signal today from southern Eleuthera island in
the caribbean...
http://www.seaturtle.org/tracking/index.shtml?tag_id=84206&zoom=1%E3%80%88=


And please remember to read Marshall Iliff's excellent article...  Hurricane
Irene en route ?
eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/hurricane-irene-en-route>


Tom Robben
Glastonbury CT

From john.oshlic at yahoo.com  Sat Aug 27 16:23:18 2011
From: john.oshlic at yahoo.com (John Oshlick)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 13:23:18 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Sandy Point - Whimbrels
Message-ID: <1314476598.69604.yint-ygo-j2me@web120403.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>

Sandy Point, Westhaven - 2 Whimbrels in the marsh at low tide

John Oshlick
Hamden


From htg1523 at att.net  Sat Aug 27 16:55:28 2011
From: htg1523 at att.net (Hank Golet)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 16:55:28 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Griswold Pt
Message-ID: <10668B92978044739EFA246E714A952A@D5YDTZ61>

>From Hank Golet
8-27, Old Lyme, Griswold Pt, 5 BLACK TERNS

From rmharvey at snet.net  Sat Aug 27 17:05:44 2011
From: rmharvey at snet.net (Roy Harvey)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 14:05:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Barn Island White Ibis
Message-ID: <1314479144.97132.YahooMailClassic@web81505.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

Passing this along.


 From Bob and Maureen Dewire:
August 27 around 4 pm at Barn Island in Stonington there was 1 immature WHITE IBIS in with a flock of 9 Glossies and a dozen egrets in the large marsh on the south side of the 4th impoundment.


Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT


From charsjs at sbcglobal.net  Sat Aug 27 17:31:13 2011
From: charsjs at sbcglobal.net (Stephen Spector)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 14:31:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Black Tern Silver Sands SP
Message-ID: <1314480673.89014.YahooMailRC@web180002.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>

From?Steve & Charla Spector:
27 Aug 11, Silver Sands SP -- juv Black Tern around 10:30 AM
charsjs at sbcglobal.net

From closcalz at optonline.net  Sat Aug 27 17:37:50 2011
From: closcalz at optonline.net (Christopher Loscalzo)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 17:37:50 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Black Terns at Hammo.
Message-ID: <000301cc6501$924b1ab0$b6e15010$@optonline.net>

08/27/11-Madison, Hammonasset Beach State Park, Meig's Point jetty and
surrounding waters-a loose flock of NINE BLACK TERNS, seen from 2:00 to 3:30
pm.  They spent some time roosting on the jetty, but spent most of the time
flying/feeding over the shallow waters.  Perhaps there will be even rarer
terns there by Monday morning!  Also, one LITTLE BLUE HERON in the marsh.



Chris Loscalzo

Woodbridge


From dana.l.campbell at gmail.com  Sat Aug 27 17:58:35 2011
From: dana.l.campbell at gmail.com (Dana Campbell)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 17:58:35 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Savannah at my house
Message-ID: <CAOpKxkOK56eL_-2YGSQvmCbQrQR5fMzVsLANcLenXKP1aXmfnQ@mail.gmail.com>

Savannah Sparrow under my feeder in E. Hartford.  I don't usually have them
here in the yard.  I am only a short distance from Cabela's.  Wish some of
those others from there would make it onto my yard list!  Right now the
hummingbirds are chowing down constantly.  Hope they all find a safe place
to hunker down.

--
Dana Campbell, Priest in Charge
Church of the Good Shepherd, Hartford
dana.l.campbell at gmail.com

*"*Come to me bird-watching God, you will find the branches for nesting. A
mustard seed of faith grows to a place of many wings*.*"
                                    from ?Prayer of the Heart? by Maren C.
Tirabassi & Joan Jordan Grant

From mjwarner at optonline.net  Sat Aug 27 18:52:35 2011
From: mjwarner at optonline.net (Mike Warner)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 18:52:35 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] OT: Governor Malloy Message #2
Message-ID: <4A603881EBC14049AAA3504953C08D61@OfficePC>


Hi,


     Governor Malloy's updated Hurricane Irene message from 4 pm today.


http://www.news12.com/index.jsp


Mike Warner
Wilton, CT.

From elphick at sbcglobal.net  Sat Aug 27 19:29:30 2011
From: elphick at sbcglobal.net (elphick at sbcglobal.net)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 19:29:30 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Nighthawks in Storrs
Message-ID: <E295EF4C-A626-4244-B054-6CF69934585C@sbcglobal.net>

There were 460+ nighthawks heading south along the Willimantic River at Eagleville Lake this evening.

Chris

From dana.l.campbell at gmail.com  Sat Aug 27 19:48:42 2011
From: dana.l.campbell at gmail.com (Dana Campbell)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 19:48:42 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Nighthawks in East Hartford
Message-ID: <CAOpKxkPOB9Lz_ZSwSnnCKrxRibE1pnrrY5QD4Rj4MMCOYC90hw@mail.gmail.com>

>From Dana Campbell:
8/27 - East Hartford backyard - 3 Common Nighthawks
I went to take down my feeders for the big blow, and these guys flew right
over me!  Yardbird!

--
Dana Campbell, Priest in Charge
Church of the Good Shepherd, Hartford
dana.l.campbell at gmail.com

*"*Come to me bird-watching God, you will find the branches for nesting. A
mustard seed of faith grows to a place of many wings*.*"
                                    from ?Prayer of the Heart? by Maren C.
Tirabassi & Joan Jordan Grant

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sat Aug 27 21:44:15 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 21:44:15 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Communication tomorrow and Monday
Message-ID: <2BD38D79-E434-43D1-B099-3D86DE91996D@gmail.com>


Hi folks, looks like there could be a window tomorrow PM for safe post-storm birding, in addition to Monday. If we're really lucky we'll have some fast and furious rarity action. Remember to make phone calls, post to the list if you can, and take photos if you have a camera.


I will be out and about if safe, and will post results if anything noteworthy is seen.


Good luck to everyone. Hopefully the effort will pay off, and remember to be safe above all else!


Nick
Wallingford

Sent from my iPhone

From robben99 at gmail.com  Sat Aug 27 22:03:02 2011
From: robben99 at gmail.com (Thomas Robben)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 22:03:02 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Hurricane birds in the next 48hours
Message-ID: <CANpJbq1vuRir_t=Jki=oya2v24q6dink-TgNX1NkzVo5HmihJA@mail.gmail.com>


I second what Nick just said, and will keep my site updated tomorrow...
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/


assuming birders post to CTbirds or their local state bird list (and also
eBird if possible).
This site is up-to-date now, as of 9pm tonight.


And enjoy Marshall Iliff's great article...
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/hurricane-irene-en-route


Good luck and be careful.


Tom Robben
Glastonbury CT

=========================
Subject: Communication tomorrow and Monday
From: Nick Bonomo <nbonomo AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 21:44:15 -0400
Hi folks, looks like there could be a window tomorrow PM for safe
post-storm
birding, in addition to Monday. If we're really lucky we'll have some fast
and
furious rarity action. Remember to make phone calls, post to the list if
you
can, and take photos if you have a camera.


I will be out and about if safe, and will post results if anything
noteworthy
is seen.


Good luck to everyone. Hopefully the effort will pay off, and remember to
be
safe above all else!


Nick
Wallingford

From mantlik at sbcglobal.net  Sat Aug 27 22:22:31 2011
From: mantlik at sbcglobal.net (Frank Mantlik)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 19:22:31 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Stratford Black Tern
Message-ID: <1314498151.69745.YahooMailRC@web80012.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>


>From Frank Mantlik
8/27  Stratford, Stratford Point -  1 BLACK TERN flew upriver with Common Terns 
at 7pm.  Virtually nothing out over L I Sound (2 Laughing Gulls), but I scanned 
only briefly.  I was along the shoreline much of the day (Westport mostly; 
Stratford before and after work), and little else of note.

From dana.l.campbell at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 07:42:08 2011
From: dana.l.campbell at gmail.com (Dana Campbell)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 07:42:08 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] hummer question
Message-ID: <CAOpKxkOYWEQckTGMi2KV4PSK3WonDNb2frcG4t=cr3vGTRYgyA@mail.gmail.com>

I had taken down all my feeders, but put up a couple again this morning as
there were birds chirping all around.  I spread lots of seed on the ground
under the shelter of the forsythias, but I have watched the hummers making
aborted passes at the nectar.  I have another feeder hung in a more
sheltered place, but haven't been able to monitor it.  Any ideas on what to
do?  Should I hang it down lower to the ground?  Poor little guys.  Doesn't
take much of a gust to thwart their efforts to feed.

--
Dana Campbell, Priest in Charge
Church of the Good Shepherd, Hartford
dana.l.campbell at gmail.com

*"*Come to me bird-watching God, you will find the branches for nesting. A
mustard seed of faith grows to a place of many wings*.*"
                                    from ?Prayer of the Heart? by Maren C.
Tirabassi & Joan Jordan Grant

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 07:44:58 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 07:44:58 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] SOOTY TERN
Message-ID: <525CE866-B80D-44FB-B265-C85D6BD05BFF@gmail.com>


adult SOOTY TERN seen from car Morningside Dr Milford. Prolonged views as battled winds heading westish.


Nick

Sent from my iPhone

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 08:21:00 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 08:21:00 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] LT JAEGER
Message-ID: <13A1597C-5E5E-452B-8CF0-13E5DA340655@gmail.com>


Juv LT JAEGER pass down the beach also heading down coast to west. Mirningside Dr Milford. Details later.

Sent from my iPhone

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 08:30:31 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 08:30:31 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Sooty #2, unident jaeger
Message-ID: <B03C8255-FD17-40CE-BD06-7CB922045838@gmail.com>

Same spot

Sent from my iPhone


From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 09:53:43 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 09:53:43 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] BAND-RUMP, Atratford phals
Message-ID: <F5299CAE-5852-4D0F-B502-97F679D473F2@gmail.com>


Julian and I had a Band-rumped SP


Frank Mantlik has 50 RN Phalaropes in the marsh at the base of Long Beach

Sent from my iPhone


From cekroth at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 10:09:14 2011
From: cekroth at comcast.net (cekroth at comcast.net)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:09:14 +0000 (UTC)
Subject: [CT Birds] brave hummers
Message-ID: <313694260.626893.1314540554649.JavaMail.root@sz0156a.westchester.pa.mail.comcast.net>



8/28, Ellington, two hummers are acting as if there is nothing out of the ordinary,

chasing each other around the feeder and stopping to have a drink.? Amazing!

No other birds around.

Carl Ekroth

From sffaulkner at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 10:17:52 2011
From: sffaulkner at comcast.net (Sarah Faulkner)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 10:17:52 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] hummer question
In-Reply-To: <CAOpKxkOYWEQckTGMi2KV4PSK3WonDNb2frcG4t=cr3vGTRYgyA@mail.gmail.com>
References: <CAOpKxkOYWEQckTGMi2KV4PSK3WonDNb2frcG4t=cr3vGTRYgyA@mail.gmail.com>
Message-ID: <A0C7625D359442F092017DE41537DA6D@SarahPC>

I, too, am feeling badly about having taken down the feeders.  My one
remaining pole feeder is seeing lots of activity -- including one tenacious
baby cardinal who persists on sitting on top and screaming for food.  The
hummers keep coming to the backdoor, looking for their feeder... maybe in a
couple of hours I can put everything back up.  So far -- fingers crossed --
this is far less severe than a thunderstorm we had a few weeks ago.  I can't
wait to open the windows again -- getting stuffy inside!

Sarah Faulkner
Collinsville
----- Original Message -----
From: "Dana Campbell" <dana.l.campbell at gmail.com>
To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Sent: Sunday, August 28, 2011 7:42 AM
Subject: [CT Birds] hummer question


I had taken down all my feeders, but put up a couple again this morning as
there were birds chirping all around.  I spread lots of seed on the ground
under the shelter of the forsythias, but I have watched the hummers making
aborted passes at the nectar.  I have another feeder hung in a more
sheltered place, but haven't been able to monitor it.  Any ideas on what to
do?  Should I hang it down lower to the ground?  Poor little guys.  Doesn't
take much of a gust to thwart their efforts to feed.

--
Dana Campbell, Priest in Charge
Church of the Good Shepherd, Hartford
dana.l.campbell at gmail.com

*"*Come to me bird-watching God, you will find the branches for nesting. A
mustard seed of faith grows to a place of many wings*.*"
                                    from ?Prayer of the Heart? by Maren C.
Tirabassi & Joan Jordan Grant
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit
http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org



From eyeflight16 at optonline.net  Sun Aug 28 10:27:19 2011
From: eyeflight16 at optonline.net (eyeflight16 at optonline.net)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:27:19 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [CT Birds] SOOTY TERN Fairfield Beach
Message-ID: <e4dc8725ffe6.4e5a5047@optonline.net>


I am here braving the weather from my house on Fairfield Beach, and after desperate searching at Nick's reports, I have finally gotten a hurricane bird, an adult SOOTY TERN just flew by, heading west. Now, I probably should stop birding and deal with the 7-foot waves that are 20 feet from my house.


James Purcell
Fairfield

From kbosch at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 11:37:42 2011
From: kbosch at gmail.com (Scott Kruitbosch)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 11:37:42 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] SOOTY TERNS Stratford
Message-ID: <CANNUtCZao=1KAW9waPJDfu8nHxobz7sF63WxcX6ZJE5FC099WQ@mail.gmail.com>


Several at least plus Black Forster's more at Devon/Stratford bridge
more to come I'm sure Charlie Barnard found em I'm here with Frank
Mantlik now too.

--
Sent from my mobile device

Scott Kruitbosch
Stratford, CT


From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 11:43:59 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 11:43:59 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Strtdord Sooties
Message-ID: <5AB5D8F2-8196-4730-B3F8-FDD5BF8895EF@gmail.com>


Mantlik has several SOTE at rte 1 crosses housatonic in Stratford 

Sent from my iPhone


From dtrippjr at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 12:48:00 2011
From: dtrippjr at comcast.net (David Tripp jr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 12:48:00 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Bantam Lake storm petrel
Message-ID: <3C2BB938-70A2-428E-A0CB-A29A5ABD4A20@comcast.net>


Just got a call from Fran Zygmont. He is trying to relocate and nail down a storm petrel in the North Bay of Bantam Lake in Litchfield


Dave Tripp

Sent from my iPhone

From dtrippjr at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 13:00:12 2011
From: dtrippjr at comcast.net (David Tripp jr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:00:12 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Bantam Lake storm petrel
In-Reply-To: <3C2BB938-70A2-428E-A0CB-A29A5ABD4A20@comcast.net>
References: <3C2BB938-70A2-428E-A0CB-A29A5ABD4A20@comcast.net>
Message-ID: <263B76EA-3D24-4E73-A9AB-20D31A4B57BA@comcast.net>


Leach's 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 28, 2011, at 12:48 PM, David Tripp jr <dtrippjr at comcast.net> wrote:

> Just got a call from Fran Zygmont. He is trying to relocate and nail down a storm petrel in the North Bay of Bantam Lake in Litchfield
>
> Dave Tripp
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org


From fzygmont at charter.net  Sun Aug 28 13:01:17 2011
From: fzygmont at charter.net (Fran Zygmont)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:01:17 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] (no subject)
Message-ID: <8E0806F3-5010-476A-A7DF-C5E7DCD47854@charter.net>



Fran



From fzygmont at charter.net  Sun Aug 28 13:02:45 2011
From: fzygmont at charter.net (Fran Zygmont)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:02:45 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Leach's storm petrel  - Bantam Lake
Message-ID: <222A919A-F76E-4987-950A-FEF5E744623E@charter.net>


Identified as such. Snapped a couple photos too!


Fran



From dtrippjr at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 13:43:20 2011
From: dtrippjr at comcast.net (David Tripp jr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:43:20 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Bantam Lake
Message-ID: <60B5258D-E5AA-43BF-9916-18D1866BD60B@comcast.net>


4 Sooty Terns and 4 Black Terns at Point Folly !!!!!!!

Sent from my iPhone


From alexanderburdo at mac.com  Sun Aug 28 13:55:48 2011
From: alexanderburdo at mac.com (Alexander Burdo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:55:48 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] SOOTY TERNS and LEACH'S STORM-PETREL, Fairfield
Message-ID: <3F153D50-B4E0-47CA-8D21-9999F8DA2305@mac.com>


Just returned from a two-hour vigil at the mouth of Pine Creek with Christian Ghiorzi where we were able to connect with two adult SOOTY TERNS, 1 LEACH'S STORM-PETREL, 2 Whimbrel, 4 Laughing Gull and 1 probable Roseate Tern. More later, as I'm planning on heading back out. 


Alex Burdo
Fairfield 


From markaronson at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 14:04:21 2011
From: markaronson at gmail.com (Mark Aronson)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:04:21 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Royal tern
Message-ID: <CAC4M_N0JgD3OxETm_2LvPFeYHy2CphKMkF0FXu4D6bTdEOMqJg@mail.gmail.com>


New haven, morris cove, royal term, 2 pm

From gabe101296 at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 14:06:37 2011
From: gabe101296 at gmail.com (Gabriel Cohen-Glinick)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:06:37 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Storm birding tomorrow
Message-ID: <CAPQwhGHm9OHC=4Vijmuqr7pR+LHU2Dt3rqfqY1TsxbAtR7mo=w@mail.gmail.com>

Hi all,

I assume it will be, but I was wondering if others think the storm birding
will still be good tomorrow because I can't get out today.


Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated,

Thanks,

Gabe Cohen-Glinick
Providence, RI

From dtrippjr at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 14:31:30 2011
From: dtrippjr at comcast.net (David Tripp jr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:31:30 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Bantam Lake
In-Reply-To: <60B5258D-E5AA-43BF-9916-18D1866BD60B@comcast.net>
References: <60B5258D-E5AA-43BF-9916-18D1866BD60B@comcast.net>
Message-ID: <6303D6DD-D32E-4CFC-948E-B43933A93282@comcast.net>


Looks like the birds are trying to head out, gaining altitude fighting the winds. Access is limited from flooding

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 28, 2011, at 1:43 PM, David Tripp jr <dtrippjr at comcast.net> wrote:

> 4 Sooty Terns and 4 Black Terns at Point Folly !!!!!!!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org


From mardi1d at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 14:39:05 2011
From: mardi1d at gmail.com (Mardi Dickinson)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:39:05 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Red- Neck Phalarope in Norwalk
Message-ID: <0F8F1C02-BEDB-4DCF-9397-7020871FB93C@gmail.com>


2:26 - 2:37pm, RED- NECKED PHALAROPE + Photo, was present in puddle in middle of Veterns Park in South Norwalk. Just Flew East towards westport. Will update later.


Cheers,
Mardi & Towny Dickinson
Norwalk CT
http://kymry.wordpress.com
http://twitter.com/MardiWD

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 15:05:33 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 15:05:33 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Coastal birds still moving
Message-ID: <670FFAAF-D0CA-4C4D-8A5C-88C58FC570AF@gmail.com>


A slow trickle of pelagics continues. Off a dead end st near ouster river, sooty term, leachs and wilsons SP.


Amazing variety.


Nick

Sent from my iPhone

From Kfinnan at aol.com  Sun Aug 28 15:39:27 2011
From: Kfinnan at aol.com (Kfinnan at aol.com)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 15:39:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Sooty Tern Goshen
Message-ID: <33484.73262a73.3b8bf36f@aol.com>


Given the reports from nearby Bantam Lake, I had to check out  Woodridge 
Lake and saw one, lone Sooty Tern in the cove by the  marina.  Otherwise, 
there was very little activity, no Black Terns or  anything else notable.

Kevin Finnan
Goshen

From cfolsom-okeefe at audubon.org  Sun Aug 28 16:09:29 2011
From: cfolsom-okeefe at audubon.org (Folsom-O'Keefe, Corrie)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 13:09:29 -0700
Subject: [CT Birds] Black terns at Hanover Pond
Message-ID: <D180D9CFEF67814EA3197C049C4B0441171E9893@VA3DIAXVS6B1.RED001.local>


8/28/11 Hanover Pond, Meriden, from 2:30-3:00p, 3 Black terns.


Corrie Folsom-O'Keefe
Meriden, CT 

From birdinggeek at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 16:12:42 2011
From: birdinggeek at gmail.com (Mark Szantyr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 16:12:42 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Coastal birds still moving
In-Reply-To: <670FFAAF-D0CA-4C4D-8A5C-88C58FC570AF@gmail.com>
References: <670FFAAF-D0CA-4C4D-8A5C-88C58FC570AF@gmail.com>
Message-ID: <2ABA7C85-66F7-4D88-AA8F-D9317E2D3B94@gmail.com>


Sooty Tern, leaches Storm- petrel, forsters tern, caspian tern at mansfield hollow. Took me two hours to get there from home in Ashford


Mark 

On Aug 28, 2011, at 3:05 PM, Nick Bonomo <nbonomo at gmail.com> wrote:

> A slow trickle of pelagics continues. Off a dead end st near ouster river, sooty term, leachs and wilsons SP.
>
> Amazing variety.
>
> Nick
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org


From birdinggeek at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 16:16:56 2011
From: birdinggeek at gmail.com (Mark Szantyr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 16:16:56 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Coastal birds still moving
In-Reply-To: <670FFAAF-D0CA-4C4D-8A5C-88C58FC570AF@gmail.com>
References: <670FFAAF-D0CA-4C4D-8A5C-88C58FC570AF@gmail.com>
Message-ID: <74AEBF1E-0714-427C-B3C6-3D4E7DBCCFFE@gmail.com>


Black tern as well. Limited cell service


Mark 

On Aug 28, 2011, at 3:05 PM, Nick Bonomo <nbonomo at gmail.com> wrote:

> A slow trickle of pelagics continues. Off a dead end st near ouster river, sooty term, leachs and wilsons SP.
>
> Amazing variety.
>
> Nick
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org


From dtrippjr at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 16:30:43 2011
From: dtrippjr at comcast.net (David Tripp jr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 16:30:43 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Negative reports for last two hours at Bantam Lake
Message-ID: <E643FD57-B708-4742-8B81-4CEA20D61477@comcast.net>

After that brief break in the weather (blue sky and sun) no birds could be relocated.
Reinforcements along with access to the south end didn't help.

Dave Tripp

Sent from my iPhone

From cekroth at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 16:54:41 2011
From: cekroth at comcast.net (cekroth at comcast.net)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 20:54:41 +0000 (UTC)
Subject: [CT Birds] Snipsic Lake-nada
Message-ID: <1619771122.640651.1314564881872.JavaMail.root@sz0156a.westchester.pa.mail.comcast.net>






with the positive reports at other lakes, I checked "The Snip" finding nothing but a few swallows and one DC corm. 


Carl Ekroth

From Asterbunch at cox.net  Sun Aug 28 17:10:49 2011
From: Asterbunch at cox.net (Bill Asteriades)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 21:10:49 +0000
Subject: [CT Birds] Wallingford - Mississippi Kite
Message-ID: <20110828211113.KLJN3924.eastrmfepo103.cox.net@eastrmimpo01.cox.net>


8/28/11 - Wallingford over route 91 by exit 14, MISSISSIPPI KITE.  Also, thanks to Nick Bonomo, Frank Mantlik and Mark Aronson for the prompt reporting of the sooty tern, bridled tern and royal tern.


Bill Asteriades
South Glastonbury

Sent from my Droid Charge on Verizon 4GLTE

------Original Message------
From: Gabriel Cohen-Glinick <gabe101296 at gmail.com>
To: <massbird at theworld.com>,<ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>,"Gabriel Cohen-Glinick" <gabe101296 at gmail.com>
Date: Sunday, August 28, 2011 2:06:37 PM GMT-4
Subject: [CT Birds] Storm birding tomorrow

Hi all,

I assume it will be, but I was wondering if others think the storm birding
will still be good tomorrow because I can't get out today.


Any thoughts will be greatly appreciated,

Thanks,

Gabe Cohen-Glinick
Providence, RI
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org



From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 17:20:07 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 17:20:07 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Candlewood Sooties
Message-ID: <D11A6AEB-C709-4DC9-9962-C9B840C57050@gmail.com>


Jim Dugan reports 11 Sooty Terns at Candlewood Lake in New Fairfield.

Sent from my iPhone


From richardpayne07 at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 18:35:59 2011
From: richardpayne07 at gmail.com (Richard Payne)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:35:59 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Terns: CASPIAN, ROYAL, SOOTY
Message-ID: <CAJxOUak2+RcPX2p_esdjvt2VXf-Wb4ovG=cr1jiozmYzAesspw@mail.gmail.com>


Was able to do some post-storm birding on the coast this afternoon:


CASPIAN TERN - 1 in adult plumage flying over Frash Pond in Stratford, 3:15
pm




Milford Point, 4:20-4:50:


ROYAL TERN - 1 in non-breeding plumage, looking worn out, on the gravel bars
before flying into the marsh. I got within 50 feet of it before I even
noticed he was there; the bird had a metal band on its right leg; if he
sticks around should be easy enough to find tomorrow.


SOOTY TERN - 1 seen flying among a flock of ~40 Common Terns, over Long
Island Sound from the Milford Point gravel bars.


Descriptions of all birds are going into eBird soon.


~Richard

From whitewash88 at live.com  Sun Aug 28 18:43:37 2011
From: whitewash88 at live.com (Mark Barriger)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:43:37 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] storm birding
Message-ID: <BAY155-W593F96718462FC86594D32C9150@phx.gbl>




East Shore Park - (2) Sooty Terns, (35) Red-necked Phalaropes, & (5) Black Terns.

Saybrook Point - (1) Sooty Tern, (75) Red-necked Phalaropes, (1) Red Phalarope, (10) Black terns.

Broad Brook Reservoir in Cheshire - (5) Black Terns

A few distant photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/whitewash88/


Mark Barriger
Wallingford, CT  

From markaronson at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 18:58:04 2011
From: markaronson at gmail.com (Mark Aronson)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:58:04 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] A note on the Royal TernS
Message-ID: <CAC4M_N1LkZ-KH3NSry_ds2i1XznFbru1msjVjLRXJNRjSOxWuw@mail.gmail.com>


Just a note, there were 4 or 5 Royal Terns in Morris Cove, New Haven around
2 PM.  Not just 1.

From birdinggeek at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 19:00:26 2011
From: birdinggeek at gmail.com (Mark Szantyr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 19:00:26 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Mansfield Hollow today
Message-ID: <7BFEE868-A126-409B-AE18-1A7B24FAF162@gmail.com>


After taking about two hours to drive the ten miles from my house to the Hollow, I found a single adult Sooty Tern, 2 or 3 Black Terns, a Caspian Tern, 2 or 3 Forster's Terns, a tern that can only have been a Least Tern (critically studied by me, Phil Rusch, and Chris Elphick), 2 Leach's Storm-Petrels, and a medium sized all dark bird that was tantalizing but unidentified.
Mark 

From dtrippjr at comcast.net  Sun Aug 28 19:16:40 2011
From: dtrippjr at comcast.net (David Tripp jr)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 19:16:40 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Nighthawks continue
Message-ID: <5CE8BEDD-9000-4AC8-B39E-35F881EC33FA@comcast.net>


While grilling burgers (no power) 20 or so nighthawks went over fighting the winds. It reminded me of our exciting day of the Sooty and Black Terns fighting the wind as they gained altitude leaving Bantam Lake.

Dave Tripp
Sent from my iPhone

From paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 20:02:48 2011
From: paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com (Paul Desjardins)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 20:02:48 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] West Haven
Message-ID: <D285D3B1-36C1-4E1E-965F-75E6F8A2E4A0@gmail.com>


This afternoon at Sandy Point 2 alternate plumaged Common Loons, 2 Black Terns and a Caspian Tern.

From nbonomo at gmail.com  Sun Aug 28 20:47:44 2011
From: nbonomo at gmail.com (Nick Bonomo)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 20:47:44 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] belated reports from Luke Tiller, Tom Robben's blog,
etc etc
Message-ID: <CABgXtNfUcpb8rQW4124DUnpfmimsP+7Fx348waEDDTkM8MGd3g@mail.gmail.com>


Luke Tiller, who is without power, called to report 2 SOOTY TERNS from
the Quaker Ridge Hawk Watch site in Greenwich this afternoon, plus a
very brief and poor view of 3 large birds that were either Wood Storks
or Sandhill Cranes. So keep an eye out.


Tom Robben, who also lost power, wanted folks to know that his blog
will be updated again once he regains power.
http://hurricaneirene2011.blogspot.com/


Also just wanted to say how well everyone handled the storm today.
Seems like a lot of people were able to safely get out birding at one
point or another, despite access difficulties, and the lines of
communication were in full swing. Awesome job exchanging information.


The fun may not be over yet. There are undoubtedly birds still stuck
inland that need to reorient towards the ocean if they are able.
Continue to check all bodies of water for birds. Plus keep an eye out
for some species that may be more likely to turn up after the storm
has cleared, like frigatebirds or rare passerines.


Nick


Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com


From jbudrow at sbcglobal.net  Sun Aug 28 21:27:37 2011
From: jbudrow at sbcglobal.net (Joseph Budrow)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:27:37 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Black terns at Hanover Pond
In-Reply-To: <D180D9CFEF67814EA3197C049C4B0441171E9893@VA3DIAXVS6B1.RED001.local>
Message-ID: <1314581257.28183.YahooMailClassic@web180206.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>


I, too was at Hanover Pond but lost power at the house and was unable to post. Very excited to see three birds acting so different from birds I have seen here ever. They set themselves up by pointing into the wind and flapped northwest toward the inflowing Quinnipiac River. During this trajectory they flitted up, sideways and down until they splashed down to dine on whatever. Then they would take air and zoom backwards a few hundred yards and did it all again. 


Thanks to those for posting their inland pelagic sightings. Its what got me to roll downhill to the pond and my week is made. A lifer!!


I actually went to the pond in hopes of seeing a magnificent frigatebird :(


JB 

--- On Sun, 8/28/11, Folsom-O'Keefe, Corrie <cfolsom-okeefe at audubon.org> wrote:

From: Folsom-O'Keefe, Corrie <cfolsom-okeefe at audubon.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Black terns at Hanover Pond
To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sunday, August 28, 2011, 4:09 PM


8/28/11 Hanover Pond, Meriden, from 2:30-3:00p, 3 Black terns.


Corrie Folsom-O'Keefe
Meriden, CT 
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org

From jbudrow at sbcglobal.net  Sun Aug 28 21:33:12 2011
From: jbudrow at sbcglobal.net (Joseph Budrow)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:33:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [CT Birds] Black terns at Hanover Pond
In-Reply-To: <D180D9CFEF67814EA3197C049C4B0441171E9893@VA3DIAXVS6B1.RED001.local>
Message-ID: <1314581592.11553.YahooMailClassic@web180210.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>

Another sighting you just don't see every day...

at the Meriden water treatment facility across from the airport was a large gaggle of geese just chillin' in a grassy area. They were spread out and were half-snoozin and half-eatin' grass. When up come 5 huge turkeys walkin' right through the middle of the gaggle. I thought they wanted to rumble.

Meriden turkeys are tough SOBs. But today there was no rumble.

JB

--- On Sun, 8/28/11, Folsom-O'Keefe, Corrie <cfolsom-okeefe at audubon.org> wrote:

From: Folsom-O'Keefe, Corrie <cfolsom-okeefe at audubon.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Black terns at Hanover Pond
To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sunday, August 28, 2011, 4:09 PM

8/28/11 Hanover Pond, Meriden, from 2:30-3:00p, 3 Black terns.

Corrie Folsom-O'Keefe
Meriden, CT
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org

From andrew.dasinger at UTCPower.com  Sun Aug 28 22:04:13 2011
From: andrew.dasinger at UTCPower.com (Dasinger, Andrew M        UTPWR)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 22:04:13 -0400
Subject: [CT Birds] Cabela's- East Hartford
Message-ID: <7268A8361C63E4438C3962234627C040BB0CF1@UUSNWEG3.na.utcmail.com>


8/28 - Cabela's - East Hartford (around 4 p.m.)-- 1 Least Tern, 1 Baird's Sandpiper, 1 White-rumped Sandpiper, 2 Sanderling, 20+ Pectoral Sandiper, Semipal Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Lesser Yellowlegs, over 600 Ring-billed Gulls. Rocky Hill Meadows was inacccessible. 2 additional Least Terns on the CT River in Glastonbury behind the wastewater treatment plant.


Andrew Dasinger
South Glastonbury